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I have a double loop that opens a files and uses awk to take the first section and the second section of each line. The first section is the md5sum of a file and the second chunk is the filename. However when I run the script to see if I have duplicate files, file1 fines file1 and so it thinks they are duplicaes even though they are the same file. Here is my code:

echo start
for i in $(<dump.txt) ; do
    md=$(echo $i|awk -F'|' '{print $1}')
    file=$(echo $i|awk -F'|' '{print $2}')
    for j in $(<dump.txt) ; do
        m=$(echo $j|awk -F'|' '{print $1}')
        f=$(echo $j|awk -F'|' '{print $2}')
        if [ "$md" == "$m" ]; then
            echo $file and $f are duplicates
        fi
    done
done
echo end

The dump file looks like this:

404460c24654e3d64024851dd0562ff1 *./extest.sh
7a900fdfa67739adcb1b764e240be05f *./test.txt
7a900fdfa67739adcb1b764e240be05f *./test2.txt
88f5a6b83182ce5c34c4cf3b17f21af2 *./dump.txt
c8709e009da4cce3ee2675f2a1ae9d4f *./test3.txt
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e *./checksums.txt

The Entire code is:

#!/bin/sh
func ()  
{
if [ "$1" == "" ]; then
echo "Default";
for i in `find` ; 
do
    #if [ -d $i ]; then
        #echo $i "is a directory";
    #fi
    if [ -f $i ]; then
        if [ "$i" != "./ex.sh" ]; then
            #echo $i "is a file";
            md5sum $i >> checksums.txt;
            sort --output=dump.txt checksums.txt;
        fi
    fi
done
fi

if [ "$1" == "--long" ]; then
echo "--long";
for i in `find` ; 
do
    #if [ -d $i ]; then
        #echo $i "is a directory";
    #fi
    if [ -f $i ]; then
        echo $i "is a file";        
    fi
done
fi

if [ "$1" == "--rm" ]; then
echo "--rm";
for i in `find` ; 
do
    #if [ -d $i ]; then
        #echo $i "is a directory";
    #fi
    if [ -f $i ]; then
        echo $i "is a file";        
    fi
done
fi
}

parse () {
echo start
for i in $(<dump.txt) ; do
    md=$(echo $i|awk -F'|' '{print $1}')
    file=$(echo $i|awk -F'|' '{print $2}')
    for j in $(<dump.txt) ; do
        m=$(echo $j|awk -F'|' '{print $1}')
        f=$(echo $j|awk -F'|' '{print $2}')
        #echo $md
        #echo $m
        if [ "$file" != "$f" ] && [ "$md" == "$m" ]; then
            echo Files $file and $f are duplicates.
        fi
    done
done
echo end
}

getArgs () {
if [ "$1" == "--long" ]; then
    echo "got the first param $1";
else
    if [ "$1" == "--rm" ]; then
        echo "got the second param $1";
    else
        if [ "$1" == "" ]; then
            echo "got default param";
        else
            echo "script.sh: unknown option $1";
            exit;
        fi  
    fi
fi
}


#start script
cat /dev/null > checksums.txt;
cat /dev/null > dump.txt;
getArgs $1;
func $1;
parse;
#end script
share|improve this question
1  
IMHO it would help a lot to use a higher level scripting language at this point, e.g. Ruby or Python -- that would make things easier – Tilo Oct 10 '11 at 20:29

It's pretty simple:

if [ "$file" != "$f" ] && [ "$md" = "$m" ]; then
  echo "Files $file and $f are duplicates."
fi

Note that I changed the comparison operator from == to =, which is the common form. I also surrounded the message by double quotes to make it clear that it is a single string and that I don't want the word expansion to happen on the two variables file and f.

[Update:]

Another way to find duplicates, which is much faster, is to use awk for string processing:

awk -F'|' '
  NF == 2 {
    if (fname[$1] != "") {
      print("Files " fname[$1] " and " $2 " are duplicates.");
    }
    fname[$1] = $2;
  }
' dump.txt
share|improve this answer
    
I like this if statement a lot. However I am not getting any duplicate files, I know for a fact that there are 2 identical files. It appears the the md and m variables are getting the second chunk of the awk statement sometimes instead of just the first – Eric Anderson Oct 10 '11 at 19:52
    
Then maybe you need to show us how your dump.txt looks like. From the code I guessed that it contains two fields per line, separated by |. – Roland Illig Oct 10 '11 at 20:07

you don't really need loop or two loops if you decide to solve it with awk. It is something like nuclear head in text processing.

   awk -F'|' '{if($1 in a)print "duplicate found:" $0 " AND "a[$1];else a[$1]=$0 }' yourfile

will bring what you need. of course the text info you could customize.

see the test below

kent$  cat md5chk.txt 
abcdefg|/foo/bar/a.txt
bbcdefg|/foo/bar2/ax.txt
cbcdefg|/foo/bar3/ay.txt
abcdefg|/foo/bar4/a.txt
1234567|/seven/7.txt
1234568|/seven/8.txt
1234567|/seven2/7.txt


kent$  awk -F'|' '{if($1 in a)print "duplicate found:" $0 " AND "a[$1];else a[$1]=$0 }' md5chk.txt
duplicate found:abcdefg|/foo/bar4/a.txt AND abcdefg|/foo/bar/a.txt
duplicate found:1234567|/seven2/7.txt AND 1234567|/seven/7.txt

updated

awk     # the name of the tool/command
-F'|'   # declare delimiter is "|"
'{if($1 in a)  # if the first column was already saved
print "duplicate found:" $0 " AND "a[$1];  # print the info
else    # else
a[$1]=$0 }'  # save in an array named a, index=the 1st column (md5), value is the whole line.
yourfile  # your input file
share|improve this answer
    
this works great, what exactly is this doing though? It looks complex. Could you break it down for me? – Eric Anderson Oct 10 '11 at 20:53
    
@EricAnderson see update – Kent Oct 10 '11 at 21:03
    
It's actually the same as my second suggestion. a in the awk program is a map, a dictionary, an associative array, however you may call it. Going through the list of files, one uses the hashcode as the key to the map, and if there is already an entry you know that you found a duplicate. – Roland Illig Oct 10 '11 at 21:04
    
Is there a way where i only print the filename and not the md5sum? – Eric Anderson Oct 10 '11 at 21:12
    
Im also going to need to be able to delete the files that are duplicates. How would I access each file individually? – Eric Anderson Oct 10 '11 at 21:20

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