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In Windows shell you can fetch the contents of a file and copy it to "\Device\Null" with a command like copy c:\filename NUL. (This is useful for recalling externally-archived files without wasting space or updating with touch.)

But I can't figure out how to do the same in PowerShell using $null, NUL, \\.\NUL and more (and I don't want to call out a separate CMD.EXE process to do this for every file).

PS C:\> Copy-Item -Path  .\filename -Destination NUL
Copy-Item : Cannot process path 'C:\NUL' because the the target represents a reserved device name.
At line:1 char:10
+ Copy-Item <<<<  -Path  .\filename -Destination NUL
    + CategoryInfo          : WriteError: (C:\NUL:String) [Copy-Item], IOException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : CopyError,Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.CopyItemCommand

PS C:\> Copy-Item .\filename NUL
Copy-Item : Cannot process path 'C:\NUL' because the the target represents a reserved device name.
At line:1 char:10
+ Copy-Item <<<<  .\filename NUL
    + CategoryInfo          : WriteError: (C:\NUL:String) [Copy-Item], IOException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : CopyError,Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.CopyItemCommand

PS C:\> copy .\filename '\\.\NUL'
Copy-Item : Cannot process path '\\.\NUL' because the the target represents a reserved device name.
At line:1 char:5
+ copy <<<<  .\filename '\\.\NUL'
    + CategoryInfo          : WriteError: (\\.\NUL:String) [Copy-Item], IOException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : CopyError,Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.CopyItemCommand

Any other ideas how to do this?

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That's because $null isn't a device/drive per se in Powershell. Guess Out-Null won't work any better. But I still don't really get what you are trying to achieve with copying to $null, can you elaborate? –  Torbjörn Bergstedt Oct 10 '11 at 19:57
    
Some archiving software will save the actual file data off to another remote filesystem/database/tape but leave behind a tiny stub marked with NTFS' "offline" attribute. When a user fetches the content of the file (not just the file attributes), the software fetches it from the archive and restores the local file. Thus... the easiest way to restore all the stubbed/offline files is to copy them somewhere--but copying to another files system takes forever (and then you have to delete all the crap), whereas copying them to NUL is faster. –  ewall Oct 10 '11 at 20:29
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Effectively, you just want to do a read on the file. If so, this will work:

Get-ChildItem .\filename | Get-Content | Out-Null

It's probably overkill though. You could try:

$File=[system.io.file]::OpenRead(".\filename")
$File.Close()

This just opens the file for reading (which may be enough to bring it back) and closes it again.

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/me smacks forehead... Your answer makes perfect sense. Thanks, @craika! –  ewall Oct 11 '11 at 21:08
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