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I have the next query for getting addresses within a given distance and given postal code. Distance is calculated, based upon longitude and latitude data.

In this example i have replaced the user-input for just values (lat=52.64, long=6.88 en desired distance=10km)

the query:

SELECT *,
ROUND( SQRT( POW( ( (69.1/1.61) * ('52.64' - latitude)), 2) + POW(( (53/1.61) * ('6.88' - longitude)), 2)), 1) AS distance
FROM lp_relations_addresses distance
WHERE distance < 10
 ORDER BY `distance`  DESC

gives unknown column distance as error message. when leaving out the where clausule i get every record of the table including their calculated distance. In this case i have to fetch the whole table.

How do i get only the desired records to fetch??

Thanks in advance for any comment!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't reference an alias in the select clause from another part of the sql statement. You need to put the whole expression in your where clause:

WHERE
    ROUND( SQRT( POW( ( (69.1/1.61) * ('52.64' - latitude)), 2)
        + POW(( (53/1.61) * ('6.88' - longitude)), 2)), 1) < 10

A cleaner solution would be to use a sub-query to generate the calculated data:

  SELECT *, distance
    FROM (
       SELECT *,
           ROUND( SQRT( POW( ( (69.1/1.61) * ('52.64' - latitude)), 2)
               + POW(( (53/1.61) * ('6.88' - longitude)), 2)), 1) AS distance
           FROM lp_relations_addresses
       ) d
   WHERE d.distance < 10
ORDER BY d.distance DESC

Demo: http://www.sqlize.com/q96p2mCwnJ

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again! it's time for me to sleep:) This problem was much too easy to solve..... –  Terradon Oct 10 '11 at 21:27
    
Tomorrow i will try your cleaner solution and compare them with Explain, many thanks again, your contribution saved a lot of hours for me! –  Terradon Oct 10 '11 at 21:34
2  
+1 for the sqlize site :) –  Tom Knapen Oct 10 '11 at 21:34
    
@Terradon: I would take a look at Ilmari Karonen's solution as well as it might be more efficient. –  mellamokb Oct 10 '11 at 21:46

As mellamokb notes, you can't reference column aliases in the WHERE clause. You can, however, do it in a HAVING clause:

SELECT *,
  ROUND( SQRT( POW( ( (69.1/1.61) * ('52.64' - latitude)), 2) +
         POW(( (53/1.61) * ('6.88' - longitude)), 2)), 1) AS distance
FROM lp_relations_addresses
HAVING distance < 10
ORDER BY distance DESC

Ps. If you have lots of addresses, you might want to consider optimizing the query by ruling out some of them early. For example, with suitable indexes, the following version might be considerably faster:

SELECT *,
  ROUND( SQRT( POW( ( (69.1/1.61) * ('52.64' - latitude)), 2) +
         POW(( (53/1.61) * ('6.88' - longitude)), 2)), 1) AS distance
FROM lp_relations_addresses
WHERE latitude > '52.64' - 10 / (69.1/1.61)
  AND latitude < '52.64' + 10 / (69.1/1.61)
  AND longitude > '6.88' - 10 / (53/1.61)
  AND longitude < '6.88' + 10 / (53/1.61)
HAVING distance < 10
ORDER BY distance DESC
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+1 Tho you need to have the ORDER BY clause after the HAVING clause, then it works beautifully: sqlize.com/7e8TpPqiuj –  mellamokb Oct 10 '11 at 21:29
    
@mellamokb: Thanks, fixed. –  Ilmari Karonen Oct 10 '11 at 22:19
    
Thank you all for your contribution! saved me some headache –  Terradon Oct 11 '11 at 10:09

You are aliasing the calculation as 'distance', but you are also aliasing table 'lp_relations_addresses' as 'distance'. Try giving them a different name like this:

SELECT *,
ROUND( SQRT( POW( ( (69.1/1.61) * ('52.64' - latitude)), 2) + POW(( (53/1.61) * ('6.88' - longitude)), 2)), 1) AS distance
FROM lp_relations_addresses addr
WHERE distance < 10
ORDER BY `distance`  DESC
share|improve this answer
    
I tried your code too, but distance in where clausule gives an unknown column distance as error. –  Terradon Oct 10 '11 at 21:28
    
Well spotted on the table alias clash, but as mellamokb notes, you can't use an alias in a where, but you can do this in a having as Ilmari notes ... –  StuartLC Oct 10 '11 at 21:47

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