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I am trying to convert a function from a camera SDK I am using to a class, so I can call the different parts of the function separately (initialisation, capture image, clean up). A problem I am having is that some variables in the function are defined as:

type& var = type::init();

This doesn't work when I do:

class myClass
{
private:
type& var;
};

I've tried to change:

type& var;

To:

type* var;

And that worked fine when I had everything in a single function, but when I try to break it up into separate functions in a class, the code compiles but doesn't run. Is there something fundamentally wrong with my code?

EDIT: The code is from Basler's SDK, the original code is:

Pylon::CTlFactory& TlFactory = Pylon::CTlFactory::GetInstance();

In the header file:

Pylon::CTlFactory *TlFactory;

And the cpp file:

TlFactory = &Pylon::CTlFactory::GetInstance();

As mentioned, when all the code is in a single function, it compiles and runs fine, it's only when I break it up into class functions that I have problems...

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If you have run-time issues after changing from reference to a pointer, you need to show us more code. Like, how var is initialized ? –  Mahesh Oct 10 '11 at 22:32
    
Thanks Mahesh, more code has been added. –  chocobo_ff Oct 11 '11 at 0:51
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

References are not assignable. When you have a reference as a class member object, you need to initialize it in the constructor. For that, you use the constructor initialization list:

class myClass
{
public:
    myClass( type& some_var )
      : var( some_var )
    {}

private:
    type& var;
};
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The way the code is written (not mine) at the moment, it gets a bit too complex if I used the constructor initilisation list, e.g. if I have two variables, the second one is dependent on the first one. This is why I tried to change the references to pointers. –  chocobo_ff Oct 10 '11 at 22:42
    
@chocobo_ff: dependencies are fine, members of the class are guaranteed to be initialized in the order they apear in the class definition (not the initializer list). –  ybungalobill Oct 10 '11 at 22:52
    
Great, thanks for the answer, took a while but think I have solved it :) –  chocobo_ff Oct 11 '11 at 19:05
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In addition to the answer of K-ballo, note this (useful, IMO) feature of C++ scoping rules: you can expose the very same name as formal parameter in the constructor. This allows handy code cut & paste, avoiding the need to dream of 'use once' names.

class myClass
{
public:
    myClass( type& var )
      : var( var )
    {}

private:
    type& var;
};
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class myClass
{
public:
    myClass() : var(Pylon::CTlFactory::GetInstance())
    {
        // rest of init logic
    }
private:
    Pylon::CTlFactory& var;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Problem with doing that is, I have something like IPylonDevice &Camera = *TlFactory.CreateDevice(devices[ 0 ]);, followed by IStreamGrabber &StreamGrabber = *Camera.GetStreamGrabber(0); which is dependent on Camera... what do I do about those in this case? Thanks. –  chocobo_ff Oct 11 '11 at 0:54
    
Just do the same thing. That should work fine, as long as you have defined Camera before StreamGrabber in the class declaration. –  Ayjay Oct 11 '11 at 1:05
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