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I instantiate a disposable object (in my case a FileStream) in my constructor and need to do some work on it. However, this might throw any number of different exceptions. Now I don't even want to mess with these exceptions too much and want to allow them to propagate up to the caller. However, I need to dispose the object first. Now what's the best way to do that? Right now I can only think of something like that:

IDisposable disposableObject = InstantiateDisposable();
bool error = false;
try
{
    DoWork(disposableObject);
}
catch (ReallyBadException e)
{
    error = true;
    throw new EvenWorseException("some message", e);
}
catch (Exception)
{
    error = true;
    throw;
}
finally
{
    if (error) disposableObject.Dispose();
}

Is that even correct or will the Dispose() be skipped in some special cases? Is there an easier way to do that? It gets a bit cumbersome, if you need to catch a bunch of different exceptions seperately for whatever reason and you always have to copy & paste that error = true; bit.

Edit: Just to clarify: I only need to dispose the object in case of DoWork() failing / throwing an exception. If this method succeeds, I don't want to dispose the object just yet, as there'll be more work to do with it later on.

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you just do all the work inside a using block? –  LukeH Oct 10 '11 at 22:47
    
I can't, because I'll need to use the disposable object frequently over a relatively long time period. For that reason I intend to keep it alive as long as the "parent" object holding a reference to it is kept alive. –  Mario Oct 10 '11 at 22:51
    
Ok, that makes sense. Maybe you should edit the question to make that requirement explicit. –  LukeH Oct 10 '11 at 22:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Why not invert the logic?

IDisposable disposableObject = InstantiateDisposable();
bool error = true;
try
{
    DoWork(disposableObject);
    error = false; // if it gets to this line, no exception was thrown
}
catch (ReallyBadException e)
{        
    throw new EvenWorseException("some message", e);
}    
finally
{
    if (error) disposableObject.Dispose();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, that's so obvious... I feel somewhat stupid now. It's still a lot of boiler-plate code, though. –  Mario Oct 10 '11 at 22:41
    
@Mario the catch(Exception) can be removed entirely in this case, at least. I'll edit to remove it. –  Paul Phillips Oct 10 '11 at 22:46

Don't try and "handle" exceptions you can't actually do anything about.

Unless you've got some clear usefulness from logging a diagnostic, or re-throwing as a different type, just let it fail & release 'disposableObject' in a 'finally' clause!

Many people get too confused, or do pointless mick-muckery, when it comes to exception handling. You should get a trace when it comes out at the bottom. No point in 'catch & immediately re-throw'.

IDisposable disposableObject = InstantiateDisposable();
bool error = true;
try {
    DoWork(disposableObject);
    error = false; // if it gets to this line, no exception was thrown

} finally {
    if (error) disposableObject.Dispose();
}

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Is it just me, or is finally { if (error) dispose(); } serving the exact same purpose as catch (Exception) { dispose(); throw; }? You could get rid of the condition altogether, and you don't need a finally block unless you have code that must always run. –  cHao Oct 10 '11 at 22:58
    
@cHao In this code sample, yeah. But the question does some exception-specific work that this answer omits. –  Paul Phillips Oct 10 '11 at 23:08
    
@Paul: That's the whole point of the answer -- that that exception-specific work should be omitted. With that gone, there's nothing in the way of catching Exception and doing cleanup that should only happen if an exception is thrown, rather than abusing finally as an exception handler. –  cHao Oct 10 '11 at 23:13
    
@cHao Wrapping a "native" exception with one specific to your application is a pretty good practice. I think it's a more than acceptable reason to include a specific catch. –  Paul Phillips Oct 10 '11 at 23:21
    
@Paul: Tell that to Thomas. It's his answer; i'm just running with his idea. :) –  cHao Oct 10 '11 at 23:29
IDisposable disposable = InstantiateDisposable();
try
{
    try
    {
        DoWork(disposable);
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        disposable.Dispose();
        throw;
    }
}
catch (ReallyBadException ex)
{
    throw new EvenWorseException("some message", ex);
}

Although, really, unless you are returning the object or squirreling it away for something, you should use a using block and always dispose it.

share|improve this answer
    
doesn't this wrap every type of exception in an EvenWorseException? So the caller must always inspect the inner exception to determine what type of exception was really thrown? –  adrift Oct 10 '11 at 23:23
    
@adrift: Nope. It only wraps ReallyBadExceptions in an EvenWorseException. Other exceptions will propagate as is. –  cHao Oct 10 '11 at 23:27
    
yes, I see :) +1 –  adrift Oct 10 '11 at 23:33
    
One problem with this approach is that it will cause all finally methods between the throw and your code to execute, before the system can determine whether the exception will be caught. If one isn't going to resolve an exception, it's generally better not to catch it than to unconditionally catch and rethrow. –  supercat Jun 28 '12 at 20:37
    
@supercat: The finally code will run either way; each try/catch's finally block runs once control leaves it, whether it completed successfully or threw an exception. Unless you're saying something different than you're saying. –  cHao Jun 28 '12 at 20:49

Why not Dispose in the catch?

IDisposable disposableObject = InstantiateDisposable();

try
{
    DoWork(disposableObject);
}
catch (ReallyBadException e)
{
    disposableObject.Dispose();
    throw new EvenWorseException("some message", e);
}
catch (Exception)
{
    disposableObject.Dispose();
    throw;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Biggest reason for not disposing in the catch blocks is, you're repeating yourself. You don't want to have to remember to dispose the object through every possible error path, cause it's all but guaranteed you'll eventually miss one. –  cHao Oct 10 '11 at 22:51
    
@cHao: True but if you are going to be adding a boolean to indicate when in the finally you are going actually dispose its really no more work either way. Now you need to flag in every catch to dispose the object, why not just dispose there? You make this point in your comment on Thomas W.'s answer. –  tkeE2036 Oct 10 '11 at 23:17
    
@tkeE2036: Exactly the reason i haven't upvoted any answers that involve a flag. :) See my answer for a more foolproof way. Although inverting the logic does drastically reduce the error-proneness of using a flag...at that point, you only set it if everything went OK, rather than every time an error happens. If you keep the number of exit points down, or do all your bailing before you reach the point of needing cleanup, then that's one setting of the flag. –  cHao Oct 10 '11 at 23:19
    
@cHao, for me at least, KISS outweighs DRY in this particular example. If the code ever changed to become more complex, I would consider refactoring. But really, it's only 1 line being repeated. –  adrift Oct 10 '11 at 23:21
    
@adrift: It often starts out as "only 1 line", and before you know it you have a big bowl of copypasta. Better to not even start down that road, IMO. –  cHao Oct 10 '11 at 23:24

Is there a reason why you're not disposing the object when there's no error? You probably should be!

Using the standard using pattern means that your object will always be safely disposed, and then you only need to worry about catching any exceptions -- eg, ReallyBadException -- which need special attention. Any other exceptions will bubble up to the caller.

using (IDisposable disposableObject = InstantiateDisposable())
{
    try
    {
        DoWork(disposableObject);
    }
    catch (ReallyBadException e)
    {
        throw new EvenWorseException("some message", e);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
(not my DV) aside the fact that the OP does not want to dispose the object unless there's an exception, isn't throwing exception from a using block kinda useless. Don't using blocks swallow exceptions, per se? –  Bala R Oct 10 '11 at 22:43
2  
@Bala: A using block creates a finally, not a catch, so exceptions aren't swallowed. –  Gabe Oct 10 '11 at 22:45
    
@Gabe see digitallycreated.net/Blog/51/c –  Bala R Oct 10 '11 at 22:46
    
Right, I only need to dispose right there, if there's some kind of error. If DoWork() actually succeeds without exception, I'll store a reference to the disposable object for later use. Of course it'll be disposed eventually at some point in the future - just not right there. –  Mario Oct 10 '11 at 22:46
2  
@BalaR: That's just an artifact of throwing an exception from a finally block. The OP's code has the same "problem", assuming that the Dispose call he's making can throw in the first place. –  Gabe Oct 10 '11 at 22:57

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