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I have a custom UIViewController whose UIView takes up a corner of the screen, but most of it is transparent except for the parts of it that have some buttons and stuff on it. Due to the layout of the objects on that view, the view's frame can cover up some buttons beneath it. I want to be able to ignore any touches on that view if they aren't touching anything important on it, but I seem to only be able to pass along actual touch events (touchesEnded/nextResponder stuff). If I have a UIButton or something like that which doesnt use touchesEnded, how do I pass the touch event along to that?

I can't just manually figure out button selector to call, because this custom ViewController can be used on many different views. I basically need a way to call this:

[self.nextResponder touchesEnded:touches withEvent:event];

on UIControl types as well.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Probably the best way to do this is to override hitTest:withEvent: in the view that you want to be ignoring touches. Depending on the complexity of your view hierarchy, there are a couple of easy ways to do this.

If you have a reference to the view underneath the view to ignore:

- (UIView *)hitTest:(CGPoint)point withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
{
    UIView *hitView = [super hitTest:point withEvent:event];

    // If the hitView is THIS view, return the view that you want to receive the touch instead:
    if (hitView == self) {
        return otherView;
    }
    // Else return the hitView (as it could be one of this view's buttons):
    return hitView;
}

If you don't have a reference to the view:

- (UIView *)hitTest:(CGPoint)point withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
{
    UIView *hitView = [super hitTest:point withEvent:event];

    // If the hitView is THIS view, return nil and allow hitTest:withEvent: to
    // continue traversing the hierarchy to find the underlying view.
    if (hitView == self) {
        return nil;
    }
    // Else return the hitView (as it could be one of this view's buttons):
    return hitView;
}

I would recommend the first approach as being the most robust (if it's possible to obtain a reference to the underlying view).

EDIT

If you create your 'ignoring' view programatically, create your view subclass (I've called it MyPassthroughView) and set it as the view controller's view in loadView:

- (void)loadView
{
    CGRect rootFrame = //...
    MyPassthroughView *passthroughView = [[MyPassthroughView alloc] initWithFrame:rootFrame];
    self.view = passthroughView;
    // ...
    // Additional setup...
    // ...

    [passthroughView release];  // (If not using ARC...)
}
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That seems like what I want to do, but the view I want ignoring touches is the view property of a UIViewController I created, so is there a way to override the hitTest function of that view? –  chris Oct 10 '11 at 23:48
1  
@chris: Sure, just subclass it and throw in the overridden method as shown above. It means you'll have an extra .h and .m file hanging around with very little code in it, but it will do the job. Besides, a passthrough view is a useful subclass to have in your toolkit. If your view controller creates the view in a nib, just going into the IB file and change the view's class to your new subclass in the identity inspector. If it's created programmatically, then create and assign your view subclass in loadView (see edit). –  Stuart Oct 10 '11 at 23:53
    
Wonderful advise! I've been searching for a good solution for a whole day. Thanks. –  Judioo Oct 8 '12 at 18:10
    
Works well however i would like the otherView to be returned only if the event is a tap event, not a drag event. Is there a way to differentiate the different kind of events? –  htafoya Dec 20 '12 at 18:41
    
@htafoya: It sounds like gesture recognizers are what you need there. Gestures recognizers for a particular gesture (e.g. a tap) are only handled by the view to which they are attached. In general you should use touch handling (hitTest:withEvent:) to decide whether a view should receive touches at all, but use gesture recognizers to distinguish between different types of touch. –  Stuart Dec 22 '12 at 16:19

I haven't found a good way to pass UITouch events between objects. What usually works better is to implement hitTest and return nil if the point isn't in the view that you want to handle it:

- (UIView *)hitTest:(CGPoint)point withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
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