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This is a general programming question, not pertaining to any specific language.

A new programmer typically will write a method that calculates some value, then returns the value:

public Integer doSomething()
{
   // Calculate something
   return something;
}

public void main()
{
  Integer myValue = doSomething();
}

But when an exception occurs during the calculation of something, what is the best way to handle the exception, especially when giving the user feedback? If you do a try/catch of the calculation of something and if an exception is caught, what do you return? Nothing was calculated, so do you return null? And once you return it (whatever it may be), do you need to do another try/catch in the parent method that checks to see if a valid value was returned? And if not, then make sure the user is given some feedback?

I have heard arguments on both sides of the table about never returning values at all, but instead setting calculated values as pointers or global variables and instead returning only error codes from methods, and then (in the parent method) simply handling the error codes accordingly.

Is there a best practice or approach to this? Are there any good resources that one could access to learn more about the best way to handle this?

UPDATE for Clarification

Consider the following code:

public void main()
{
  int myValue = getMyValue();

  MyUIObject whatever = new MyUIObject();
  whatever.displayValue(myValue); // Display the value in the UI or something
}

public Integer getMyValue()
{
  try
  {
    // Calculate some value
  } catch (exception e) {
    // ??
  }
  return value;
}

I call the method to get some int value, then I return it. Back in main(), I do something with the value, like show it in the Log in this case. Usually I would display the value in the UI for the user.

Anyways, if an exception is caught in getMyValue(), so does value get returned but it's null? What happens in main() then? Do I have to test if it's a valid value in main() as well?

I need the program to handle the error accordingly and continue. Someone below suggested displaying the appropriate information in the UI from within the getMyValue() method. I see two potential issues:

  1. It seems like I would be mixing the business logic with (in this case) the logic for the UI.
  2. I would have to pass a reference of the MyUIObject to the getMyValue() or something so I could access it from within the function. In the above simple example that is no big deal, but if there is a BUNCH of UI elements that need to be updated or changed based off of what happens in getMyValue(), passing them all might be a bit much...

I've read a bunch about the fundamentals of all of this but I can't seem to find a straight answer for the above situation. I appreciate any help or insight.

share|improve this question
    
What language is this? We can give you more specific references, then. –  jwd Oct 10 '11 at 22:43
    
You can pretend it's Java. –  Jakobud Oct 10 '11 at 22:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you do not quite understand exceptions.

If you throw an exception, you do not return from the function normally:

public Integer doSomething()
{
   throw new my_exception();
   // The following code does NOT get run
   return something;
}

public void main()
{
  Integer myValue = doSomething();
}

The main advantages of exceptions are:

  • You can write your code as though everything is succeeding, which is usually clearer
  • Exceptions are hard to ignore. If an exception is unhandled, typically an obvious and loud error will be given, with a stack trace. This contrasts with error codes, where it is much easier to ignore the error handling than not.

I recommend this post by Eric Lippert, which discusses exceptions and when it is and is not appropriate to handle them.


UPDATE (in response to comment):

You can absolutely handle an exception and continue, you do this by catching the exception.

eg:

try
{
   // Perform calculation
}
catch (ExceptionType ex)
{
   // A problem of type 'ExceptionType' occurred - you can do whatever you
   // want here.
   // You could log it to a list, which will be later shown to the user,
   // you could set a flag to pop up a dialog box later, etc
}

// The code here will still get run even if ExceptionType was thrown inside
// the try {} block, because we caught and handled that exception.

The nice thing about this is that you know what kind of thing went wrong (from the exception type), as well as details (by looking into the information in ex), so you hopefully have the information you need to do the right thing.


UPDATE 2 in response to your edit:

You should handle the exception at the layer where you are able to respond in the way you want. For your example, you are correct, you should not be catching the exception so deep down in the code, since you don't have access to the UI, etc and you thus can't really do anything useful.

How about this version of your example code:

public void main()
{
  int myValue = -1; // some default value
  String error = null; // or however you do it in Java (:

  try
  {
    getMyValue();
  }
  catch (exception e)
  {
    error = "Error calculating value. Check your input or something.";
  }

  if (error != null)
  {
    // Display the error message to the user, or maybe add it to a list of many
    // errors to be displayed later, etc.
    // Note: if we are just adding to a list, we could do that in the catch().
  }

  // Run this code regardless of error - will display default value
  // if there was error.
  // Alternatively, we could wrap this in an 'else' if we don't want to
  // display anything in the case of an error.
  MyUIObject whatever = new MyUIObject();
  whatever.displayValue(myValue); // Display the value in the UI or something
}

public Integer getMyValue()
{
  // Calculate some value, don't worry about exceptions since we can't
  // do anything useful at this level.
  return value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
What happens if I need the program to continue working as normally, but perhaps display that a certain value was not calculated properly? For example, lets say I have a UI that has 5 different values that are calculated and then displayed. If there was an exception during the calculation of one of those values, I want to notify the user in the UI somehow but I want the program to continue working and still calculate the other values as expected. I don't want my program to just stop working... How do I handle this? –  Jakobud Oct 10 '11 at 22:46
    
@Jakobud: I updated my answer to address your comment - does that help? –  jwd Oct 10 '11 at 22:52
    
Question updated for you. –  Jakobud Oct 11 '11 at 14:59
    
@Jakobud: I added another update, in response to yours. Does that help? –  jwd Oct 11 '11 at 17:37
    
That is much more clear. Thanks! –  Jakobud Oct 11 '11 at 19:58

Exceptions is a property of object oriented languages (OOL). If you use OOL, you should prefer exceptions. It is much better than to return error codes. You can find nice examples how the error-codes approach generates a vastly longer source code than exceptions based code. For example if you want to read a file and do something with it and save in a different format. You can do it in C without exceptions, but your code will be full of if(error)... statements, maybe you will try to use some goto statements, maybe some macros to make it shorter. But also absolutely nontransparent and hard to understand. Also you can often simply forget to test the return value so you don't see the error and program goes on. That's not good. On the other hand if you write in OOL and use exceptions, your source code focuses on "what to do when there is no error", and error handling is in a different place. Just one single error handling code for many possible file errors. The source code is shorter, more clear etc.

I personally would never try to return error codes in object oriented languages. One exception is C++ where the system of exceptions have some limitations.

share|improve this answer

You wrote:

I have heard arguments on both sides of the table about never returning values at all, but instead setting calculated values as pointers or global variables and instead returning only error codes from methods, and then (in the parent method) simply handling the error codes accordingly.

[EDIT] Actually, excetion can be seen as error code, which comes along with the relative message, and you as the programmer should know where your exception must be caught, handled and eventually display to the user. As long as you let the exception to propagate (going down in the stack of called functions) no return values are used, so you don't have to care about handling related missed values. Good exception handling is a quite tough issue.

As jwd replied, I don't see the point to raise an exception in a method and then handle the excpetion in the same method just to return an error value. To clarify:

 public Integer doSomething(){

     try{

         throw new my_exception();}

     catch{ return err_value;} 

     }

is pointless.

share|improve this answer
    
You say that using global variables and pointers and not using exceptions is best practice? That is crazy! Or is it just me who misinterpreted what you wrote? –  Al Kepp Oct 10 '11 at 22:48
    
I was actually thinking in Java, where exception are seen as errors...I should edit my post :p –  ThanksForAllTheFish Oct 10 '11 at 22:53
    
It is hard to understand what you mean if you say error and think of exception. ;-) btw. Java is a very good example why exceptions are far more better then returning error codes. It makes the code safer. –  Al Kepp Oct 10 '11 at 23:02

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