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I just found this out and I'm hoping someone has a clue as to what's going on. Commands to follow (run this in a temp directory, clearing everything beforehand):

No problems:

cat << EOF > Myface.java
public interface Myface {}
EOF

cat << EOF > Myclass.java
public class Myclass implements Myface {}
EOF

javac Myface.java
javac Myclass.java

Myclass won't compile:

cat << EOF > Myface.java
package Mypackage;
public interface Myface {}
EOF

cat << EOF > Myclass.java
package Mypackage;
public class Myclass implements Myface {}
EOF

javac Myface.java
javac Myclass.java

Myclass WON'T compile:

cat << EOF > Myface.java
package Mypackage;
public interface Myface {}
EOF

cat << EOF > Myclass.java
package Mypackage;
public class Myclass implements Myface {}
EOF

javac Myclass.java

What's going on here?

EDIT: All the commands, run:

javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ ls
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ pwd
/home/javatest
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ cat << EOF > Myface.java
> public interface Myface {}
> EOF
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ 
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ cat << EOF > Myclass.java
> public class Myclass implements Myface {}
> EOF
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ 
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ javac Myface.java
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ javac Myclass.java
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ ls
Myclass.class  Myclass.java  Myface.class  Myface.java
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ rm *
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ cat << EOF > Myface.java
> package Mypackage;
> public interface Myface {}
> EOF
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ 
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ cat << EOF > Myclass.java
> package Mypackage;
> public class Myclass implements Myface {}
> EOF
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ 
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ javac Myface.java
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ javac Myclass.java
Myclass.java:2: cannot find symbol
symbol: class Myface
public class Myclass implements Myface {}
                                ^
1 error
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ rm *
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ cat << EOF > Myface.java
> package Mypackage;
> public interface Myface {}
> EOF
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ 
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ cat << EOF > Myclass.java
> package Mypackage;
> public class Myclass implements Myface {}
> EOF
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ 
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ javac Myclass.java
Myclass.java:2: cannot find symbol
symbol: class Myface
public class Myclass implements Myface {}
                                ^
1 error
javatest@l-bel-smai-ubuntu:~$ 
share|improve this question
    
Can you show the commands you ran, the folders you ran them from, and the error messages that were output by the compiler? – Michael Aaron Safyan Oct 10 '11 at 22:46
4  
Java/Class files must be put in the class path in a subfolder structure according to their packages. Maybe thats the problem here. – Gandalf Oct 10 '11 at 22:51
    
@Michael Ok, done. – Stefan Mai Oct 10 '11 at 22:55
3  
Geez, what a long day. You're right Gandalf. Write it in an answer and claim your prize ;). – Stefan Mai Oct 10 '11 at 22:56
    
There is no requirement in Java that the source files be in any particular directory structure (some tools may depend on it, but none in the JDK do that I am aware of). It is sane to put them in a directory structure of course :-) – TofuBeer Oct 10 '11 at 23:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yeah here we go: Java/Class file directory structure must match the package structure the Java classes are declared in for compilation and class loading to work correctly.

share|improve this answer

While compiling Myclass.java add the classpath option

javac -classpath . Myclass.java
share|improve this answer

Case 2: When you compile Myclass.java the javac will look for Mypackage/Myface.class. Thats not there. You should compile with javac -d . which makes javac to create the appropriate directory structure for classes it generates. That is also implicitely in the searchpath for the next javac call.

Case 3: When you compile Myclass.java it will look for Mypackage/Myface.class, then for a suitable source file given on the commandline then for a suitable sourcefile in Mypackage/Myface.java. Neither exist. Either compile with javac -d Myface.java Myclass.java or shove the *.java into the appropriate directory structure indicated by the package names.

share|improve this answer

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