Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I see the need to copy and paste the following error handling code several times. What are my options when working within a Catch statement?

  • In doing so, will I lose valuable information in the process? (example: are exceptions re-wrapped in another exception, or loss of stack information)

  • How can someone tell the difference between a "throw" in myAbstractClass and one in the Select method below?

Here is sample code I want to replicate

public class StackUserDataSource : AbstractEnhancedTableDataSource<StackUserDataServiceContext>
{
  //.. stuff

 public IEnumerable<StackUserDataModel> Select() 
    {
        try
        {
            var results = from c in _ServiceContext.StackUserTable
                          select c;

            var query = results.AsTableServiceQuery();
            var queryResults = query.Execute();

            return queryResults;
        }
        catch (StorageClientException e)
        {

           // Todo: consider sticking this in another central location    
            switch (e.ErrorCode)
            {
                case StorageErrorCode.AccessDenied:
                    break;
                case StorageErrorCode.AccountNotFound:
                    break;
                case StorageErrorCode.AuthenticationFailure:
                    break;
                // ... Yadda yadda, handle some exceptions, not others.. this is a demo.
                case StorageErrorCode.TransportError:
                    break;
                default:
                    break;
            }
            throw;
        }
    }

Update:

I doubt this is possible, but can I dynamically catch and filter exceptions in an external library? The concept goes like this

        try
        {
            var results = from c in _ServiceContext.StackUserTable
                          select c;

            var query = results.AsTableServiceQuery();
            var queryResults = query.Execute();

            return queryResults;
        }
        catch (MyExternalExceptionHelperDLL e)
        {
            // all exceptions referenced in MyExternalHelper are passed below
            MyExternalExceptionHelper.ProcessException(e);
         }
         catch (exception)
        {
         }

Since it's probably not possible for the MyExternalExceptionHelperDLL to dynamically pick and choose what to listen for (i.e. SQL, vs Networking vs File, but not authentication)

        try
        {
            var results = from c in _ServiceContext.StackUserTable
                          select c;

            var query = results.AsTableServiceQuery();
            var queryResults = query.Execute();

            return queryResults;
        }
         catch (exception e)
        {
           MyExternalExceptionHelper.ProcessException(e);

           // The problem is that I don't know how to catch exceptions thrown from that static method above,
           // or how to override that exception handling...
        }

But with the above code, its not clear to me how the end user can opt into or override my methods of event handling.

share|improve this question
    
You can call a helper method in a catch block just like anywhere else... –  mellamokb Oct 10 '11 at 22:51
    
Is there a reason that long switch statement does nothing? –  Paul Phillips Oct 10 '11 at 22:58
    
Thanks @mellamokb , I just updated the question... –  makerofthings7 Oct 10 '11 at 22:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could do something like this. The important part is that the throw needs to be in the original catch block in order to preserve the stack trace.

public IEnumerable<StackUserDataModel> Select() 
{
    try
    {
        ...
    }
    catch (StorageClientException e)
    {
       // You could do this if there is no fancy processing to do
       if (!IsCatchableException(e))
          throw;
    }
}

bool IsCatchableException(StorageClientException e)
{
    ... optionally do some fancy processing of the exception, e.g. logging....
    switch (e.ErrorCode)
    {
        case StorageErrorCode.AccessDenied:
        case StorageErrorCode.AccountNotFound:
        ....
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I want the consumer of my class to override my exception handling. Would it be wise to make IsCatchableException be invoked in the catch (Exception e) section, and then let my app figure out if the exception applies to it? Idea being that the user can always implement catch (SpecialException abc) and my code will never see that. –  makerofthings7 Oct 10 '11 at 23:11

You can only invoke throw; directly inside a catch clause, while throw e; can be invoked at any point where you have an exception instance e. The difference between them is that throw; rethrows the exception while keeping its original stack trace intact, while throw e; resets the stack trace so that it appears that the exception was originally thrown by throw e; - which could be quite annoying when debugging. So I suggest that you extract the switch statement to a separate method that takes a StorageClientException as a parameter, but keep throw; directly in the catch clause.

share|improve this answer
    
So is a proper implementation of ProcessException(e); such that it returns a bool and the the throw occurs in that exact method, versus my DLL? –  makerofthings7 Oct 10 '11 at 23:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.