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I am currently learning how to program in SQL. I have a table1 that has 'firstname', 'lastname', and 'roomname' and I have another table2 that has all the 'roomnames'. I was wondering how to select 'firstname' and 'lastname' from those people who have been in ALL of the rooms. Do I need a GROUP BY?

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What dialect of SQL are you working with? –  Jamie F Oct 10 '11 at 23:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For TransactSQL, if you know that every row in your first table is distinct, then this would work:

SELECT
   firstname,
   lastname
FROM
   table1
GROUP BY
   firstname,
   lastname
HAVING
   COUNT(DISTINCT RoomName) = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table2)

This should be pretty efficient, but not too flexible, in case you wanted to ignore certain rooms.

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What if names are repeated in table1? –  Y_Y Oct 11 '11 at 0:21
1  
It's fine if names are repeated, as long as they would always have a different room attached. That is, the combination of firstname, lastname and roomname is unique for every row. –  Jamie F Oct 11 '11 at 0:22
    
what if they do have the same room attached? this is basically the problem I am facing right now... –  Y_Y Oct 11 '11 at 1:20
    
I've changed my answer slightly. It should now handle this. But once you are getting entirely duplicate rows, you are in a bad place. Either your tables are structured poorly, or your approach to the problem is wrong (i.e. you are asking the wrong question). –  Jamie F Oct 11 '11 at 1:32

Group by is a command in order to group your results

As I can see you have duplicates in table1: Let's say:

**table1:**
firstname lastname roomname
Theodore  Hello    roomA
Mike      World    roomA
Theodore  Hello    roomB
Theodore  Hello    roomC
NickThe   Greek    roomC

And **table2:**
roomname
roomA
roomB
roomC

As you can see Theodore is the one that had passed from all rooms from table2. In common language (a good approach for constructing SQL queries) you would say: Grab the person(s) from table1 who have passed from all the rows of table2:

Take a look at here: Fetching only rows that match all entries in a joined table (SQL)

But as Jamie said this is not a proper sql syntax and way of thinking

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Your data model does not fit your question.
If people can be in multiple rooms you need a 3rd table to implement the n:m relationship like this:
(Tested with PostgreSQL 9.0)

CREATE SCHEMA x;
CREATE TABLE x.person(person_id integer primary key, firstname text, lastname text);
CREATE TABLE x.room(room_id integer primary key, roomname text);
CREATE TABLE x.person_room(person_id integer, room_id integer);

INSERT INTO x.person VALUES(1,'fred', 'foo'), (2,'gert', 'goo'), (3,'harry', 'hoo');
INSERT INTO x.room VALUES(1,'room1'),(2,'room2'), (3,'room3');
INSERT INTO x.person_room VALUES(1,1),(1,2),(1,3),(2,1),(2,2),(3,1);

Your query then can look like this (demonstrating you do not need a GROUP BY):
Edit: even better, without LEFT JOIN, only semi join EXISTS needed. Should be fast, too.

SELECT p.*
  FROM x.person p
 WHERE NOT EXISTS(

   SELECT *
     FROM x.room r
    WHERE NOT EXISTS (

      SELECT *
        FROM x.person_room pr
       WHERE pr.person_id = p.person_id
         AND pr.room_id   = r.room_id));

Output:

 person_id | firstname | lastname
-----------+-----------+----------
         1 | fred      | foo
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