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I have a couple dozen text (.txt) files containing long lists of words (one per line) that I want to convert into an audio file using OS X Lion 'Text to Speech.' To do so, I need to add in synth voice markup tags to control speech timing.

Script 1

Here is the format of what I have in .txt files:

Word1
Word2
Word3

Here is what I need to create the audio file:

Word1
[[slnc 600]]

[[slnc 900]]
Word1

[[slnc 3000]]

Word2
[[slnc 600]]

[[slnc 900]]
Word2

[[slnc 3000]]

Word3
[[slnc 600]]

[[slnc 900]]
Word3

[[slnc 3000]]

...etc,

The text files are on my Desktop in a folder called 'Words.' If possible, it would be great if the script could be pointed towards this folder and told to iterate through each .txt file within, performing the changes described above.

Script 2

This one needs to read in tab-delimited words/phrases from .txt files within a Desktop folder called 'French.' Here is the tab-delimited .txt file format:

FrenchWord/Phrase1   EnglishWord/Phrase1
FrenchWord/Phrase2   EnglishWord/Phrase2

...etc,

And then output as:

say "FrenchWord/Phrase1" using "Thomas"
delay 3
say "EnglishWord/Phrase1" using "Daniel"

delay 5

say "FrenchWord/Phrase2" using "Thomas"
delay 3
say "EnglishWord/Phrase2" using "Daniel"

delay 5

...etc,

Since the .txt input files in this case contain both single words and phrases, I'm guessing that the script will need to grab everything 'left-of-tab-delimiter' as French, and everything 'right-of-tab-delimiter' as 'English.'

Any assistance would be immensely appreciated!:)

Cheers,

Dave

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1 Answer

$ cat words.txt 
Word1
Word2
Word3
$ ./script1 words.txt # will produce words-with-timings.txt
$ cat words-with-timings.txt 
Word1
[[slnc 600]]

[[slnc 900]]
Word1

[[slnc 3000]]

Word2
[[slnc 600]]

[[slnc 900]]
Word2

[[slnc 3000]]

Word3
[[slnc 600]]

[[slnc 900]]
Word3

[[slnc 3000]]

$ cat phrases.txt 
FrenchWord/Bon jour EnglishWord/Good day
FrenchWord/Bon mot  EnglishWord/Well met
$ ./script2 phrases.txt # will produce phrases-with-timings.txt
$ cat phrases-with-timings.txt 
say "FrenchWord/Bon jour" using Thomas
delay 3
say "EnglishWord/Good day" using Daniel

delay 5

say "FrenchWord/Bon mot" using Thomas
delay 3
say "EnglishWord/Well met" using Daniel

delay 5

Script1:

#!/bin/bash

for wordfile_txt in "$@"
do

  wordfile_with_timings_txt=`echo $wordfile_txt | sed s/.txt/-with-timings.txt/`

  # Refuse to overwrite
  if [[ "$wordfile_txt" == "$wordfile_with_timings_txt" ]]
  then
    echo ".txt files only pls"
    exit 1
  fi

  while read word
  do
    echo $word
    echo '[[slnc 600]]'
    echo
    echo '[[slnc 900]]'
    echo $word
    echo
    echo '[[slnc 3000]]'
    echo
  done < $wordfile_txt > $wordfile_with_timings_txt

done

Script2:

#!/bin/bash

for phrasefile_txt in "$@"
do

  phrasefile_with_timings_txt=`echo $phrasefile_txt | sed s/.txt/-with-timings.txt/`

  # Refuse to overwrite
  if [[ "$phrasefile_txt" == "$phrasefile_with_timings_txt" ]]
  then
    echo ".txt files only pls"
    exit 1
  fi

  while read line
  do
    phrase1="`echo "$line" | cut -f 1`"
    phrase2="`echo "$line" | cut -f 2`"

    echo say \"$phrase1\" using "Thomas"
    echo delay 3
    echo say \"$phrase2\" using "Daniel"
    echo
    echo delay 5
    echo
  done < $phrasefile_txt > $phrasefile_with_timings_txt

done

To run these in batch I suggest using find and xargs:

$ find lotta-words -type f
lotta-words/words1.txt
lotta-words/words2.txt
lotta-words/words3.txt
$ find lotta-words -type f | xargs ./script1 
$ find lotta-words -type f
lotta-words/words1-with-timings.txt
lotta-words/words1.txt
lotta-words/words2-with-timings.txt
lotta-words/words2.txt
lotta-words/words3-with-timings.txt
lotta-words/words3.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, phs! Could you please clarify your 'find/xargs' suggestion for me, though? Are the code lines beginning with '$' to go within scripts, and if so, which ones where? And is 'lotta-words' to be replaced by 'folder name' ("Words" or "French") containing .txt files for batch processing? –  user536067 Oct 11 '11 at 5:02
    
The lines starting with $ are prompts, they indicate commands run outside of scripts. And yes, lotta-words was just meant to indicate a directory holding your files. –  phs Oct 11 '11 at 5:14
    
Ok. This is still unclear to me I'm afraid as only used to working with sed one-liners, etc through Automator. This is all very new to me (obviously). I really need to know explicitly what to do with the command prompts. If they belong in script1/script2, where should they be? And does lotta-words need to be replaced by an explicit path to folder containing files, or only if bash (.sh) script file is saved to a different location than target folder. - i've tried googling this but only confused me more... –  user536067 Oct 11 '11 at 6:13
    
While I'm here... also confused by the section starting with $ cat words.txt. I'm assuming they're external prompts for dealing with individual files - not batch, but I can't see how the script as a whole comes together. If you don't mind, could you please edit your Script1/Script2 answers so they are complete executable scripts. Maybe then it'll become clear how it works and is put to work. Cheers. –  user536067 Oct 11 '11 at 6:40
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