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I'm pretty new to perl. I have an SomeItem object that contains an array of InnerObjects, of which I want to call the "foo" method on.

foreach $obj (@ { $self->{InnerObjects} }) {
   $obj->foo();
}

This doesn't work. Here's the error I get:

Can't call method "foo" without a package or object reference

The InnerObject class is in the same file as SomeItem, and would prefer to keep it that way if possible, so how can I access the InnerObject class/package from the SomeItem class/package?

Here's how I declare the array in the constructor:

$self->{InnerObjects} = [];

and set it:

sub set {
   my ($self, @items) = @_;
   @{ $self->{InnerObjects} } = @items;
}
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2  
How do you build InnerObjects? –  mu is too short Oct 11 '11 at 3:48
5  
$self->{InnerObjects} does not contain (a reference to) an array of objects as you claim. It is a reference to an array, but the array contains something other than (just) objects. The error is not in the code you posted. –  ikegami Oct 11 '11 at 4:39
    
If they were InnerObjects then your for loop would work. Why don't you try dumping the contents of $self->{InnerObjects} and see what is actually in there. –  stevenl Oct 11 '11 at 13:03
    
It appears to be losing its identity when I call $currentSomeItem->set(@myInnerObjects) Once I try to do anything within the currentSomeItem on those InnerObjects it fails with that error. Is there some way to cast it as an InnerObject like in Java or other strongly typed languages? –  Mushr00mOmelet Oct 11 '11 at 17:51
    
In the main loop, you can debug with print ref($obj) in order to see the package of the $obj variable. I think is not an object of the class you are thinking. –  Miguel Prz Oct 12 '11 at 15:12

2 Answers 2

Your code so far looks legitimate. Therefore the error MAY be in the data passed to set().

Please add the following to set code:

sub set {
   my ($self, @items) = @_;
   @{ $self->{InnerObjects} } = @items;
   print "OBJECT To work on: " . ref($self) . "\n";
   print "TOTAL objects passed: " . scalar(@items) . "\n";
   foreach my $obj (@items) { print "REF: " . ref($obj) . "\n" };
}

This will show how many objects you passed and whether they are indeed objects of correct class (ref should print class name)

Also, please be aware that @{ $self->{InnerObjects} } = @items; copies over the array of object references, instead of storing the reference to the original array @items - this is NOT the reason for your problem at all but causes you to basically allocate 2 arrays instead of one. Not a major problem memory-management wise unless the array is very large, but still wasteful (@items array would need to be garbage collected after set() is done).

I apologize for putting what was essentially comment-content as an answer but it's too big to be a comment.

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It appears to be losing its identity when I call $currentSomeItem->set(@myInnerObjects) Once I try to do anything within the currentSomeItem on those InnerObjects it fails with that error. Is there some way to cast it as an InnerObject like in Java or other strongly typed languages? –  Mushr00mOmelet Oct 11 '11 at 18:16
    
@Mushr00mOmelet - what exactly do those debug prints generate? –  DVK Oct 11 '11 at 20:02
    
@Mushr00mOmelet - and please provide the code that calls set –  DVK Oct 11 '11 at 20:03
    
Output: OBJECT To work on: SomeItem TOTAL objects passed: 1 REF: –  Mushr00mOmelet Oct 11 '11 at 20:34
    
The code is above, $currentSomeItem->set(@myInnerObjects) I can print out the contents of each InnerObject in @myInnerObjects just fine before executing this line. –  Mushr00mOmelet Oct 11 '11 at 20:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

My solution to the problem ended up creating a hash that contained the ID of the SomeItem which points to a reference of an array of InnerObjects. This hash is created by the manipulating classlike so,

%SomeItemInnerObjects;     # Hash of SomeItem IDs=>InnerObject array references
$SomeItemInnerObjects{ $currentSomeItem->{ID} } = \@myInnerObjects;

and gets used as follows:

foreach $item (@{ $SomeItemInnerObjects{$currentSomeItem->{ID} } }) {
    # item is an InnerObject 
    $item->foo($currentSomeItem->{ID});
}

So SomeItem no longer contains InnerObjects. I know this doesn't answer the question per se, but presents an alternate solution.

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