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The following code doesn't work to download a file (btw clen is file's length):

    int pos = 0, total_pos = 0;
    byte[] buffer = new byte[BUFFER_SIZE];
            while (pos != -1) {
                pos = in.read(buffer, 0, BUFFER_SIZE);
                total_pos += pos;
                out.write(buffer);
                setProgress((int) (total_pos * 100 / clen));
            }

...but this works fine:

    int buf;
    while ((buf = in.read()) != -1)
        out.write(buf);

I'm wondering why, even though the second code segment works quickly. On that note, is there any particular reason to use a byte[] buffer (since it doesn't seem to be faster, and BufferedInputStream already uses a buffer of its own....?)

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's how it should be done.

public static void copyStream(InputStream is, OutputStream os)
    {
        byte[] buff = new byte[4096];
        int count;
        try {
            while((count = is.read(buff)) > 0)
                os.write(buff, 0, count);

        }catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }finally {
            try {
                if(is != null)
                    is.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            try {
                if(os != null)
                    os.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }

        }
    }
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thank you st0le (and pimaster.) I see that my error was in out.write(buffer); that was writing all of buffer's bytes instead of only those that were read in per buffer-read. Problem solved! Thanks ;) –  Nick Chandoke Oct 11 '11 at 4:30
    
Please accept the answer if you found it helpfull. Cheers. –  st0le Oct 11 '11 at 6:22
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I've tried to make the minimum changes necessary to your code to get it working. st0le did a good job of providing a neater version of stream copying.

public class Test {
    private static final String FORMAT = "UTF-8";
    private static final int BUFFER_SIZE = 10; // for demonstration purposes.
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        String string = "This is a test of the public broadcast system";
        int clen = string.length();
        ByteArrayInputStream in = new ByteArrayInputStream(string.getBytes(FORMAT));
        OutputStream out = System.out;
        int pos = 0, total_pos = 0;
        byte[] buffer = new byte[BUFFER_SIZE];
        while (pos != -1) {
            pos = in.read(buffer, 0, BUFFER_SIZE);
            if (pos > 0) {
                total_pos += pos;
                out.write(buffer, 0, pos);
                setProgress((int) (total_pos * 100 / clen));
            }
        }
    }
    private static void setProgress(int i) {
    }
}
  • You were ignoring the value of pos when you were writing out the buffer to the output stream.
  • You also need to re-check the value of pos because it may have just read the end of the file. You don't increment the total_pos in that case (although you should probably report that you are 100% complete)
  • Be sure to handle your resources correctly with close()s in the appropriate places.

-edit- The general reason for using an array as a buffer is so that the output stream can do as much work as it can with a larger set of data.

Writing to a console there might not be much of a delay, but it might be a network socket being written to or some other slow device. As the JavaDoc states

The write method of OutputStream calls the write method of one argument on each of the bytes to be written out. Subclasses are encouraged to override this method and provide a more efficient implementation.

The benefit of using it when using a Buffered Input/Output Stream are probably minimal.

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while ((pos = in.read(buffer)) > 0) does all that much more cleanly. –  EJP Oct 11 '11 at 4:06
    
Agreed but the question was focussed around why his code didn't work. So my priority was around fixing what was wrong with his code. What is our duty in providing re factoring suggestions in cases like these? I'll take it under consideration for answering future questions. –  pimaster Oct 11 '11 at 4:17
    
No problem, just a comment. –  EJP Oct 11 '11 at 4:32
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