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Okay, so I'm just learning about templates. Anyways, I'm probably (most definitely) doing something wrong, but here's the problem:

My first template function is declared like this:

template<typename T>
std::ostream& printFormatted(T const& container, std::ostream& os = std::cout) {
    //...
}

Then I'm supposed to implement a specialized case for maps, so this is what I tried to do:

template<>
std::ostream& printFormatted<std::map<typename key, typename value>>(std::map<typename key, typename value> const& container, std::ostream& os = std::cout) {
    //...
}

I might be making a mistake with my key/value variables, not sure, but regardless, when trying to compile I get the error message:

error: wrong number of template arguments (1, should be 4)
error: provided for ‘template<class _Key, class _Tp, class _Compare, class _Allocator> class std::__debug::map’

Clearly there's something I don't understand about templates or maps? Someone please help?

share|improve this question
    
Are key and value actual types in your code or do you intend them as placeholders? – Luc Danton Oct 11 '11 at 4:10
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming your uses of key and value are meant to be placeholers, you cannot declare template parameters inline with the keyword typename. That is to say, Foo<typename T> is always invalid -- but not to be mistaken with Foo<typename T::bar> which is different altogether. The syntax for specialization looks like:

// Declare template parameters up front
template<typename Key, typename Value>
std::ostream&
printFormatted<std::map<Key, Value> >(std::map<Key, Value> const& container, std::ostream& os = std::cout);

but that wouldn't work because it's a partial specialization and those are not allowed for function templates. Use overloading instead:

template<typename Key, typename Value>
std::ostream&
printFormatted(std::map<Key, Value> const& container, std::ostream& os = std::cout);

This overload will be preferred over the more general template.

share|improve this answer
2  
That only matches maps with less<K> and std::allocator, though :-( – Kerrek SB Oct 11 '11 at 4:17
    
Thanks, this fixed things up perfectly! – Fault Oct 11 '11 at 4:23

What you're doing is not full specialization, but partial specialization, since you still have a template, only a more specialized one. However, you cannot partially specialize functions, so instead, we just provide a new overload. For std::map, you need four template parameters (as the error message helpfully tells you):

template <typename K, typename V, typename Comp, typename Alloc>
std::ostream & printFormatted(const std::map<K,V,Comp,Alloc> & m,
                              std::ostream & o = std::cout)
{
  // ...
}
share|improve this answer

This answer is not relevant to C++11

If you're using a pre-c++11 compiler, you can't use >> when closing nested templates. You need a space between the >s.

C++ sees >> as a different token than >, and the compiler doesn't use it to close templates. You need a space so the compiler sees a > followed by a >.

The following is more likely to work:

template<>
std::ostream& printFormatted<std::map<typename key, typename value> >(std::map<typename         key, typename value> const& container, std::ostream& os = std::cout) {
    //...
}
share|improve this answer
    
That was actually fixed in C++0x / C++11 – Fault Oct 11 '11 at 4:25
    
Fantastic! I hadn't heard that, and it drove me nuts when I was just starting C++. I'll leave this answer up to help anyone using an old compiler, but edit it to clarify that point. – Dan Oct 11 '11 at 4:28
    
Even though I find '> > ' with spaces more readable! – Andreas W. Wylach Jul 12 '12 at 5:15

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