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After getting suggestion's from here. I changed my code as :

my $lineCount=0;
while (my $line = <>){
        for  (split /\s+/, $line)
        {
                $words{$_} ++;
        }
        print "Interpreting the line \t $line\n";
        $lineCount++;
}
foreach $k (sort keys %words) {
    print "$k => $words{$k}\n";
}
foreach $k (sort keys %words) {
     $count = $count+$words{$k};
}
print "the total number of words are $count. \n";
$test = scalar(keys %words);
print "The number of distinct words are $test. \n";
print "The number of line is $lineCount. \n";
print "The word distribution is as follows \n";
my %lengths;
$lengths{length $_} += $words{$_} for keys %words;
foreach $k (sort keys %lengths) {
        print "$k => $lengths{$k}\n";
}

Now I wish to add the search functionality in this code. Example if I get search keyword from the user using <STDIN>, then with the help of that keyword how I can find the number of search word in the given text file(which I'm passing to the code)?

Since I'm a novice in Perl, I need a more Perl way of doing this.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
FYI: if you find using a bunch of print statements in a row, you might want to use either a heredoc or just open a qq –  vol7ron Oct 11 '11 at 4:15
    
!?!?!. I'm a novice in Perl. I just started to experiment it using print statements. However will try to see what are heredoc and qq are.. –  sriram Oct 11 '11 at 4:18
    
why a downvote?? –  sriram Oct 11 '11 at 7:37
    
Not sure, it wasn't me. My guess is that "search functionality" is misleading and I'm not sure that "perl way" is the common expression. –  vol7ron Oct 11 '11 at 13:30
    
Just curious if my answer was helpful –  vol7ron Oct 21 '11 at 19:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can do something like this :

chomp (my $keyword = <STDIN>);
if(exists($words{$keyword}))
{
        print "The word $keyword occured $words{$keyword}";
}
else
{
        print "The word  $keyword doen't occur sorry!";
}

See here, under the topic : Testing for the Presence of a Key in a Hash

Hopes this helps.

share|improve this answer

You can try:

   my $lineCount = 0;
   my %lengths;

   while (<>){
      for (split /\s+/) {
         $words{$_}++;
      }
      print "Interpreting the line \t $_\n";
      $lineCount++;
   }

   foreach (sort keys %words) {
      print "$_ => $words{$_}\n";
      $count = $count+$words{$k};
   }

   my $test = scalar(keys %words);
   $lengths{length $_} += $words{$_} for keys %words;


# Output Results

   print <<"END";
The total number of words are $count.
The number of distinct words are $test.
The number of lines is $lineCount.
The word distribution is as follows:
END

   foreach (sort keys %lengths) {
      print "$_ => $lengths{$_}\n";
   }


#Get user input
   my $input = <STDIN>;
   chomp $input;

   print "$input: $words{$input} matches\n" if $words{$input};
share|improve this answer

You can reuse the %words hash to check for the existence and the total count of the keywords. You can add this code after the text file is read and %words is populated.

my $msg = "Enter keyword (Ctrl+d on Unix or Ctrl+Z on Windows for none): ";
print "\n$msg";
while ( chomp (my $keyword = <STDIN>) ) 
{
    #check if the keyword exists in %words.
    if ( my $total_keyword = $words{$keyword} ) 
    {
        print "\nTotal number of the keyword $keyword is - $total_keyword\n";
    }
    print "\n$msg";
}
share|improve this answer
    
it is executing the thing is after printing the output it hangs. –  sriram Oct 11 '11 at 6:49
    
It does not hang, it is just waiting for the next keyword from the user. I though you needed multiple keywords to be analyzed, so the while loop. If only one keyword needs to be checked for, change the while loop to a 'if' loop. The while iterations will stop when the EOF (Press Ctrl/Z in Windows, Ctrl/d in Linux) will be reached. I assumed you knew how <> operator worked in while loop. Check the updated code for some added clarity. –  Shalini Oct 11 '11 at 12:51

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