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I have a large number of Enums that implement this interface:

/**
 * Interface for an enumeration, each element of which can be uniquely identified by it's code
 */
public interface CodableEnum {

    /**
     * Get the element with a particular code
     * @param code
     * @return
     */
    public CodableEnum getByCode(String code);

    /**
     * Get the code that identifies an element of the enum
     * @return
     */
    public String getCode();
}

A typical example is:

public enum IMType implements CodableEnum {

    MSN_MESSENGER("msn_messenger"),
    GOOGLE_TALK("google_talk"),
    SKYPE("skype"),
    YAHOO_MESSENGER("yahoo_messenger");

    private final String code;

    IMType (String code) {
    	this.code = code;
    }

    public String getCode() {
    	return code;
    }	

    public IMType getByCode(String code) {
    	for (IMType e : IMType.values()) {
    		if (e.getCode().equalsIgnoreCase(code)) {
    			return e;
    		}
    	}
    }
}

As you can imagine these methods are virtually identical in all implementations of CodableEnum. I would like to eliminate this duplication, but frankly don't know how. I tried using a class such as the following:

public abstract class DefaultCodableEnum implements CodableEnum {

    private final String code;

    DefaultCodableEnum(String code) {
    	this.code = code;
    }

    public String getCode() {
    	return this.code;
    }	

    public abstract CodableEnum getByCode(String code);  
}

But this turns out to be fairly useless because:

  1. An enum cannot extend a class
  2. Elements of an enum (SKYPE, GOOGLE_TALK, etc.) cannot extend a class
  3. I cannot provide a default implementation of getByCode(), because DefaultCodableEnum is not itself an Enum. I tried changing DefaultCodableEnum to extend java.lang.Enum, but this doesn't appear to be allowed.

Any suggestions that do not rely on reflection? Thanks, Don

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15 Answers 15

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You could factor the duplicated code into a CodeableEnumHelper class:

public class CodeableEnumHelper {
    public static CodeableEnum getByCode(String code, CodeableEnum[] values) {
        for (CodeableEnum e : values) {
            if (e.getCode().equalsIgnoreCase(code)) {
                return e;
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}

Each CodeableEnum class would still have to implement a getByCode method, but the actual implementation of the method has at least been centralized to a single place.

public enum IMType implements CodableEnum {
    ...
    public IMType getByCode(String code) {
        return (IMType)CodeableEnumHelper.getByCode(code, this.values());
    } 
}
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1  
As an improvement, you could just eliminate the getByCode from the interface. It's enough to provide it in the helper (as a static method). That way there's even less duplication in the individual enums. –  sleske Mar 18 '10 at 16:46
    
this.values() referes to a static method and should be IMType.values(). I would even remove the requirement to pass in an array of value an instead pass in an enum class literal allowing to use type.getEnumConstants(). –  whiskeysierra Jul 31 '10 at 10:09
    
typo: CodableEnum should be CodeableEnum –  Antony Stubbs Aug 16 '12 at 13:18

Abstract enums are potentially very useful (and currently not allowed). But a proposal and prototype exists if you'd like to lobby someone in Sun to add it:

http://freddy33.blogspot.com/2007/11/abstract-enum-ricky-carlson-way.html

Sun RFE:

http://bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6570766

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To tidy up dave's code:

public class CodeableEnumHelper {
    public static <E extends CodeableEnum> E getByCode(
        String code, E[] values
    ) {
        for (E e : values) {
            if (e.getCode().equalsIgnoreCase(code)) {
                return e;
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}

public enum IMType implements CodableEnum {
    ...
    public IMType getByCode(String code) {
        return CodeableEnumHelper.getByCode(code, values());
    } 
}

Or more efficiently:

public class CodeableEnumHelper {
    public static <E extends CodeableEnum> Map<String,E> mapByCode(
        E[] values
    ) {
        Map<String,E> map = new HashMap<String,E>();
        for (E e : values) {
            map.put(e.getCode().toLowerCase(Locale.ROOT), value) {
        }
        return map;
    }
}

public enum IMType implements CodableEnum {
    ...
    private static final Map<String,IMType> byCode =
        CodeableEnumHelper.mapByCode(values());
    public IMType getByCode(String code) {
        return byCode.get(code.toLowerCase(Locale.ROOT));
    } 
}
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I think you need to substitute 'extends' for 'implements' in the code above –  Dónal Sep 17 '08 at 13:41
    
Yup. Thanks. I are idiot. Sorry for the delay updating. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 11 '08 at 1:06

I had a similar issue with a localization component that I wrote. My component is designed to access localized messages with enum constants that index into a resource bundle, not a hard problem.

I found that I was copying and pasting the same "template" enum code all over the place. My solution to avoid the duplication is a code generator that accepts an XML configuration file with the enum constant names and constructor args. The output is the Java source code with the "duplicated" behaviors.

Now, I maintain the configuration files and the generator, not all of the duplicated code. Everywhere I would have had enum source code, there is now an XML config file. My build scripts detect out-of-date generated files and invoke the code generator to create the enum code.

You can see this component here. The template that I was copying and pasting is factored out into an XSLT stylesheet. The code generator runs the stylesheet transformation. An input file is quite concise compared to the generated enum source code.

HTH,
Greg

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Nice idea, thanks for sharing the implementation –  Dónal Sep 16 '08 at 22:45

Unfortunately, I don't think that there is a way to do this. Your best bet would pro ably be to give up in emums altogether and use conventional class extension and static members. Otherwise, get used to duplicating that code. Sorry.

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Create a type-safe utility class which will load enums by code:

The interface comes down to:

public interface CodeableEnum {
    String getCode();
}

The utility class is:

import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;


public class CodeableEnumUtils {
    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public static <T extends CodeableEnum>  T getByCode(String code, Class<T> enumClass) throws IllegalArgumentException, SecurityException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException, NoSuchMethodException {
		T[] allValues = (T[]) enumClass.getMethod("values", new Class[0]).invoke(null, new Object[0]);
		for (T value : allValues) {
			if (value.getCode().equals(code)) {
				return value;
			}
		}
		return null;
}

}

A test case demonstrating usage:

import junit.framework.TestCase;


public class CodeableEnumUtilsTest extends TestCase {
    public void testWorks() throws Exception {
	assertEquals(A.ONE, CodeableEnumUtils.getByCode("one", A.class));
      assertEquals(null, CodeableEnumUtils.getByCode("blah", A.class));
    }

enum A implements CodeableEnum {
	ONE("one"), TWO("two"), THREE("three");

	private String code;

	private A(String code) {
		this.code = code;
	}

	public String getCode() {
		return code;
	}	
}
}

Now you are only duplicating the getCode() method and the getByCode() method is in one place. It might be nice to wrap all the exceptions in a single RuntimeException too :)

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Great answer, but I should have specified in my original question, that I'd prefer answers that don't rely on reflection. I've updated the question. –  Dónal Sep 17 '08 at 4:02
    
No need to use reflection. There is Class.getEnumConstants(). –  whiskeysierra Jul 31 '10 at 10:10

Here I have another solution:

interface EnumTypeIF {
String getValue();

EnumTypeIF fromValue(final String theValue);

EnumTypeIF[] getValues();

class FromValue {
  private FromValue() {
  }

  public static EnumTypeIF valueOf(final String theValue, EnumTypeIF theEnumClass) {

    for (EnumTypeIF c : theEnumClass.getValues()) {
      if (c.getValue().equals(theValue)) {
        return c;
      }
    }
    throw new IllegalArgumentException(theValue);
  }
}

The trick is that the inner class can be used to hold "global methods".

Worked pretty fine for me. OK, you have to implement 3 Methods, but those methods, are just delegators.

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It seems like you are actually implementing run time type information. Java provides this as a language feature.

I suggest you look up RTTI or reflection.

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Could you elaborate on this? I don't see what you mean. –  Mwanji Ezana Sep 16 '08 at 21:47

I don't think this is possible. However, you could use the enum's valueOf(String name) method if you were going to use the enum value's name as your code.

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But where the code is not the same as the Enum's name, that won't work –  Dónal Sep 16 '08 at 22:40
    
True, of course, but the code wás the same in the example. –  Jorn Oct 9 '08 at 23:28

How about a static generic method? You could reuse it from within your enum's getByCode() methods or simply use it directly. I always user integer ids for my enums, so my getById() method only has do do this: return values()[id]. It's a lot faster and simpler.

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Could you show the implementation of this method? –  Dónal Sep 16 '08 at 22:41

If you really want inheritance, don't forget that you can implement the enum pattern yourself, like in the bad old Java 1.4 days.

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About as close as I got to what you want was to create a template in IntelliJ that would 'implement' the generic code (using enum's valueOf(String name)). Not perfect but works quite well.

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In your specific case, the getCode() / getByCode(String code) methods seems very closed (euphemistically speaking) to the behaviour of the toString() / valueOf(String value) methods provided by all enumeration. Why don't you want to use them?

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Because the codes are stored in the database and the enum name is a symbol only useful to the programmer. At least, that's the way it is around here. –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Oct 21 '08 at 20:13

Another solution would be not to put anything into the enum itself, and just provide a bi-directional map Enum <-> Code for each enum. You could e.g. use ImmutableBiMap from Google Collections for this.

That way there no duplicate code at all.

Example:

public enum MYENUM{
  VAL1,VAL2,VAL3;
}

/** Map MYENUM to its ID */
public static final ImmutableBiMap<MYENUM, Integer> MYENUM_TO_ID = 
new ImmutableBiMap.Builder<MYENUM, Integer>().
put(MYENUM.VAL1, 1).
put(MYENUM.VAL2, 2).
put(MYENUM.VAL3, 3).
build();
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In my opinion, this would be the easiest way, without reflection and without adding any extra wrapper to your enum.

You create an interface that your enum implements:

public interface EnumWithId {

    public int getId();

}

Then in a helper class you just create a method like this one:

public <T extends EnumWithId> T getById(Class<T> enumClass, int id) {
    T[] values = enumClass.getEnumConstants();
    if (values != null) {
        for (T enumConst : values) {
            if (enumConst.getId() == id) {
                return enumConst;
            }
        }
    }

    return null;
}

This method could be then used like this:

MyUtil.getInstance().getById(MyEnum.class, myEnumId);
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