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I am trying to build a C# program that converts a different language into C# code. I have the program working fine, converting the code and writing it to a .cs file. I want to have this file automatically be compiled, and run, however I cannot figure out how to do this with C#.

I can do it manually by simply running a batch file I wrote, and I attempted to run this batch file from C# using the System.Diagnostics.Process class. When it ran it gave an error within the batch code itself, saying that none of the commands were found (the usual "not an executable, batch file etc"). I can't figure out why it runs normally, but not when ran from C#.

Here's the batch file code: C:\Program_Files_(x86)\Microsoft_Visual_Studio 10.0\VC\bin\amd64\vcvars64.bat csc %1.cs pause

and the function that calls it:

System.Diagnostics.Process process = new System.Diagnostics.Process();
process.StartInfo.FileName = "compiler\\compile.bat";
process.StartInfo.Arguments = " "+fileName;
process.Start();
process.WaitForExit();
process.StartInfo.FileName = fileName + ".exe";
process.Start();
process.WaitForExit();
Console.WriteLine("done");

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
3  
Please don't do this.. – Kakashi Oct 11 '11 at 4:39
    
Check this out stackoverflow.com/questions/361097/… – V4Vendetta Oct 11 '11 at 4:40
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Don't call the C# compiler or any compiler of .net plataform using a batch script - it's a bad pratice. You can do this using only C#. using the CodeDomProvider class you can write this easily.

  static void CompileCSharp(string code) {
    CodeDomProvider provider = CodeDomProvider.CreateProvider("C#");
    ICodeCompiler compiler = provider.CreateCompiler();
    CompilerParameters parameters = new CompilerParameters();
    parameters.OutputAssembly = @"D:\foo.exe";
    parameters.GenerateExecutable = true;
    CompilerResults results = compiler.CompileAssemblyFromSource(parameters, code);
    if (results.Output.Count == 0)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("success!");
    }
    else
    {
        CompilerErrorCollection CErros = results.Errors;
        foreach (CompilerError err in CErros)
        {
            string msg = string.Format("Erro:{0} on line{1} file name:{2}", err.Line, err.ErrorText, err.FileName);
            Console.WriteLine(msg);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
CompileAssemblyFromSource call by CompilerParameters and string[],also from files by CompileAssemblyFromFile – BLUEPIXY Oct 11 '11 at 11:08
    
Thank you very much for this. I remember coming across codedom before, but I forgot about it. Just out of curiosity why is it bad practice? I know in this particular case the codedom is better, but what if this wasn't written with .NET? Would the command line be fine, or no? Would I have to use dlls then. – mirhagk Oct 11 '11 at 16:38
    
use dlls set to parameters. ex)parameters.ReferencedAssemblies.Add("System.dll"); – BLUEPIXY Oct 11 '11 at 22:49
    
I think he meant it's a bad practice because there are native methods to do so. – The Mask Oct 12 '11 at 21:41
    
ICodeCompiler compiler = provider.CreateCompiler(); is now deprecated. See: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – slcott Mar 26 '13 at 20:07

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