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I am just curious if there is an elegant way to solve following problem in c++:

I have a simulator app which contains several components connected by channels. The channels may be either network channels (two instances of the app are needed) or dummy local channel. There are two interfaces: IChannelIn and IChannelOut and two corresponding variables:

IChannelIn* in;
IChannelOut* out;

The DummyChannel is both IChannelIn and IChannelOut. It just copies input to output. There is also TCPChannelIn: public IChannelIn and separate TCPChannelOut: public IChannelOut.

Now, according to user's choice , I either create one DummyChannel

DummyChannel* d = new DummyChannel;
in = d;
out = d;

or two separate objects: in = new TCPChannelIn; out = new TcpChannelOut

The question is: what should the destructor do?

~App::App()
{
    delete in;
    delete out;
}

ends in an error because delete in; deleted also the dummy channel d so that delete out deletes already deleted thing.

Is there an elegant way out of this?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How does your class know that this is a freestore pointer? E.g. what speaks against the following code?

DummyChannel d;
in = &d;
out = &d;

This is an entirely sensible piece of code but your destructor will crash when trying to delete either of the pointers.

Long story short: reclaiming resources is the job of whoever has allocated the resources in the first place. If your class gets passed a pointer, the class cannot know and does not care about deallocation. This is strictly the responsability of the caller.

Elegant ways to solve this dilemma without making the client to a lot of work are smart pointers, as mentioned before.

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Thank you for your answer, it lead me to the right path. It is necessary to reclaim resources in the same way as the were allocated. Therefore I will keep a separate list of all channels allocated by the simulator and destruct the objects from the list. in and out will be just non-owning pointers. –  danatel Apr 21 '09 at 12:47

You'll need something along the lines of:

~App::App()
{
    if (in != out)
    {
        delete out;
    }
    delete in;
}

As when the channels are different the pointers will be different.

However, as danatel has pointed out in the comments in and out are not comparable. A safe (but inelegant) solution would be to use a dummy flag. Set if in and out are set to the dummy channel, the destructor would become:

~App::App()
{
    if (!dummy)
    {
        delete out;
    }
    delete in;
}

Though I wouldn't be happy with this.

The only other solution I can see at the moment is to change the definitions of IChannelIn and IChannelOut so that they can be compared safely.

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1  
Cannot just compare in an out, they are of dirrerent type (IChannelIn a IChannelOut). Even their address is different because after in = d in points to a subobject of d. –  danatel Apr 21 '09 at 12:27
    
Don't see why from the code you've posted where in and out are both set to d (new DummyChannel). Is there something else going on? –  ChrisF Apr 21 '09 at 12:35
    
DummyChannel is public IChannelIn and public IChannelOut. But IChannelIn and IChannelOut are otherwise unrelated clases. DummyChannel is not the parent of IChannelIn, on contrary, IChannelIn is a parent of DummyChannel. –  danatel Apr 21 '09 at 12:39
    
Ah - I see. Not sure what suggest now - I take it you can't change your design. –  ChrisF Apr 21 '09 at 12:44

If you are using boost you could consider using the boost::shared_ptr This will automatically delete the object when the last instance is released.

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I do not use boost in this project. I will consider boost in the future, but this time, it is not worth adding another dependency to my project. –  danatel Apr 21 '09 at 12:33
    
In that case use std::tr1::shared_ptr. It is not boost (well, it is boost::shared_ptr in some implementations but it is part of the upcoming standard anyway). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 21 '09 at 12:38
    
I am using visual studion 2005. Not sure if it compiles tr1. –  danatel Apr 21 '09 at 12:49
    
Why not std::auto_ptr ? –  Zitrax Apr 21 '09 at 19:25
    
std::auto_ptr is not referenced counted. So if you create two auto_ptr instances to the same object they'll both call delete in their d'tor and you are back to the double delete. boost::shared_ptr is reference counted. Hidden in the internals is a reference count that will be set to 2. When the first references goes away (say in) the count is decremented to 1. When the second reference goes away (say out) the count is decremented to 0 and the object deleted. –  Stephen Nutt Apr 21 '09 at 23:39
if (in == out) {
    delete in;
}
else {
    delete in;
    delete out;
}

?

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See comments on ChrisF's solution. Doesn't compile. –  MSalters Apr 22 '09 at 11:11

Rule of thumb: match your news with your deletes.

~App::App()
{
    delete out;
    // the next line tries to free
    // memory no longer in the app's
    // control invoking UB
    delete in;
}

Here, you run into the classic double-free problem.

~App::App()
{
    if (in != out)
    {
        delete out;
    }
    // if in == out the out object is not deleted
    // for a non trivial object this tantamounts to
    // leaking resources held by TCPChannelOut other
    // than d
    delete in;
}

The only solution seems to be to use a smart reference counted pointer.

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2  
That doesn't solve his problem at all. Setting in to NULL after deleting it doesn't make the delete out line any more valid. –  Pesto Apr 21 '09 at 11:36
    
What is wrong with this answer? This approach works, when you have multiple such shared pointers instead of just two. –  dirkgently Apr 21 '09 at 11:36
    
Even if you delete in and set it to NULL, then out still points to the old objects. –  danatel Apr 21 '09 at 11:45
    
The basic problem is, the pointer is not shared. The same address is stored by two different pointers 'in' and 'out'. Zeroing one will not prevent the double deletion of the stored address. –  Abhay Apr 21 '09 at 11:47
    
Yes, updated my post to point out why the check won't work either. –  dirkgently Apr 21 '09 at 11:57

I always think of object ownership at design time:

  • who creates the object?
  • Who owns (therefore deletes the object)?
  • How can I avoid to use a reference to an object that is already destroyed (or how can I determine whether a referenced object is still valid or not)?

When trying to answer these questions I determine the way to implement it, too (destructors, smart pointers, etc.).

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Don't forget to make your IChannelIn and IChannelOut destructors virtual. If the destructors are not virtual the TCPChannel or DummyChannel destructors will not get called when the IChannel destructors are called (i.e. when the IChannel ptr contents are deleted).

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