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This is very trivial but I am not getting it.

shadyabhi@archlinux /tmp $ ./a.out 
2345
51  <-- **Why?**
3
shadyabhi@archlinux /tmp $ ./a.out 
abhi
98
50  <-- **Why?**
shadyabhi@archlinux /tmp $ cat main.c 
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char a[10];
    scanf("%s", a);
    printf("%d\n", a[1]);
    printf("%d\n", a[1] - '0');
    return 0;
}
shadyabhi@archlinux /tmp $ 
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When a[] contains the string "2345" as you've entered, then the expression a[1] is the character code for the character '3'. Since you're using ASCII as the underlying encoding (based on the codes you're getting, though it's not strictly mandated by the standard), the characters '0' thru '9' are represented by the decimal values 48 thru 57 (hex 0x30 thru 0x39).

In other words, you have:

a[0] = '2'  = 0x32 = 50
a[1] = '3'  = 0x33 = 51
a[2] = '4'  = 0x34 = 52
a[3] = '5'  = 0x35 = 53
a[4] = '\0' = 0x00 =  0

The ASCII table is:

    | Dec Hex Chr | Dec Hex Chr | Dec Hex Chr | Dec Hex Chr | 
    |   0  00 NUL |  32  20     |  64  40  @  |  96  60  `  | 
    |   1  01 SOH |  33  21  !  |  65  41  A  |  97  61  a  | 
    |   2  02 STX |  34  22  "  |  66  42  B  |  98  62  b  | 
    |   3  03 ETX |  35  23  #  |  67  43  C  |  99  63  c  | 
    |   4  04 EOT |  36  24  $  |  68  44  D  | 100  64  d  | 
    |   5  05 ENQ |  37  25  %  |  69  45  E  | 101  65  e  | 
    |   6  06 ACK |  38  26  &  |  70  46  F  | 102  66  f  | 
    |   7  07 BEL |  39  27  '  |  71  47  G  | 103  67  g  | 
    |   8  08 BS  |  40  28  (  |  72  48  H  | 104  68  h  | 
    |   9  09 HT  |  41  29  )  |  73  49  I  | 105  69  i  | 
    |  10  0A LF  |  42  2A  *  |  74  4A  J  | 106  6A  j  | 
    |  11  0B VT  |  43  2B  +  |  75  4B  K  | 107  6B  k  | 
    |  12  0C FF  |  44  2C  ,  |  76  4C  L  | 108  6C  l  | 
    |  13  0D CR  |  45  2D  -  |  77  4D  M  | 109  6D  m  | 
    |  14  0E SO  |  46  2E  .  |  78  4E  N  | 110  6E  n  | 
    |  15  0F SI  |  47  2F  /  |  79  4F  O  | 111  6F  o  | 
    |  16  10 DLE |  48  30  0  |  80  50  P  | 112  70  p  | 
    |  17  11 DC1 |  49  31  1  |  81  51  Q  | 113  71  q  | 
    |  18  12 DC2 |  50  32  2  |  82  52  R  | 114  72  r  | 
    |  19  13 DC3 |  51  33  3  |  83  53  S  | 115  73  s  | 
    |  20  14 DC4 |  52  34  4  |  84  54  T  | 116  74  t  | 
    |  21  15 NAK |  53  35  5  |  85  55  U  | 117  75  u  | 
    |  22  16 SYN |  54  36  6  |  86  56  V  | 118  76  v  | 
    |  23  17 ETB |  55  37  7  |  87  57  W  | 119  77  w  | 
    |  24  18 CAN |  56  38  8  |  88  58  X  | 120  78  x  | 
    |  25  19 EM  |  57  39  9  |  89  59  Y  | 121  79  y  | 
    |  26  1A SUB |  58  3A  :  |  90  5A  Z  | 122  7A  z  | 
    |  27  1B ESC |  59  3B  ;  |  91  5B  [  | 123  7B  {  | 
    |  28  1C FS  |  60  3C  <  |  92  5C  \  | 124  7C  |  | 
    |  29  1D GS  |  61  3D  =  |  93  5D  ]  | 125  7D  }  | 
    |  30  1E RS  |  62  3E  >  |  94  5E  ^  | 126  7E  ~  | 
    |  31  1F US  |  63  3F  ?  |  95  5F  _  | 127  7F DEL | 

In the second case with "abhi", a[1] is equal to b which, if you examine that table above, is character code 98 decimal ( hex 0x62).

For the output lines where you subtract '0', that's actually subtracting the character code for '0', which is decimal 48 or 0x30 hex.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that the C language doesn't require the use of the ASCII character set (for example, there are implementations that use EBCDIC). But the standard does require the characters '0' .. '9' to have contiguous representations, so that, for example, '5' - '0' == 5. The language doesn't make the same guarantee for the letters, so that, 'Z' - 'A' is not necessarily 25. –  Keith Thompson Oct 11 '11 at 8:23

This: http://www.asciitable.com/ is the ascii table.
in your first try you got 51 because it's '3' (the char 3) ascii value.
in the second try you got 50 because 'b'=98 and '0'=48 so 'b'-'0'=50.

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So, the code just retrieves the digit in the integer form. Thanks –  shadyabhi Oct 11 '11 at 7:56
1  
yeah, char is basically a byte value (0-255). when doing mathematics action on it, it acts as a number. when printed, it will print the numeric value if used with %d, or the ascii char when used with %c. –  Roee Gavirel Oct 11 '11 at 8:08

This will return the ascii code of the number entered in the second position then the value of this number.

If it is '0', it will return 48 then 0.

If it is '1' it will return 49 1 and so forth.

If you use a character that is not a number, it will return its ascii code then the difference of its ascii code and the ascii code of '0'

Basically an operation (+ - ...) on a character will operate on their ascii codes: see here. So basically a[1] - '0' will return the integer value of the second character typed.

This is used to convert user input to integers like in the atoi() function.

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  • first why: 51 is the ascii value of '3' (which is a[1])
  • second why: 98 is the ascii value of 'b' and 48 is the ascii value of '0' 98 - 48 = 50

I see you are using linux. The command "ascii" prints you the ascii table.

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this is not correct. sorry, removed down vote..it's probably a typo.. :) "first why" is wrong –  duedl0r Oct 11 '11 at 7:51
1  
51 is the ASCII value of '3', not '5'. –  paxdiablo Oct 11 '11 at 7:55

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