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Puppy meta data gets read in from config file using (General::Config) and creates this hash of hashes

$puppy_hashes = {
 puppy_blue => { name => 'charlie', age => 4 },
 puppy_red  => { name => 'sam', age => 9 },
 puppy_yellow  => { name => 'jerry', age => 2 },
 puppy_green  => { name => 'phil', age => 5 },
}

the MotherDogRobot package consumes the puppies hash to birth an array of puppy objects (lol)

package MotherDogRobot;  
use Moose;
use Puppy;
use Data::Dumper;
#moose includes warn and strict

sub init_puppy{
  my($self,%options) = @_;
  my $puppy = Puppy->new( %options );
  return ($puppy);
}

sub birth_puppies{
  my($self,$puppy_hashes) = @_;
  my @keys = keys %{$puppy_hashes};
  my @puppies = map { $self->init_puppy( $puppy_hashes->{$_} ) } @keys;
  return(@puppies);
}

sub show_me_new_puppies{
  my($self,$puppy_hashes) @_;
  print Dumper($self->birth_puppies($puppy_hashes));
}

Error odd number of arguments

passing %options to Puppy->new(%options)

no luck birthing puppies -- which means I can't put lasers on their heads =/

UPDATE

I think the problem is that I'm passing a Hash Ref to init_puppy() instead of an array or hash, so when I try to pass %options to the new constructor, it's not getting a proper ( key => value) pair -- hence the odd number of arguments error.

But from this standpoint I've been looking at this code too long I cant figure out how to dereference this properly.

btw this is my official day 22 of using Perl!

share|improve this question
    
+1 in consolation for not being able to put lasers on your robo-puppies' heads. –  Dave Sherohman Oct 11 '11 at 10:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you're using empty variables as if they're not empty, that is, you're not doing anything at all

print "hi $_ " for my @foo;

This assumes that the incomplete snippet you've shown is what you're really using

update: Similarly in sub init_puppy, you never initialize my($self,%options)=@_;

#!/usr/bin/perl --
use strict;
use warnings;
Main( @ARGV );
exit( 0 );
sub Main {
    my $puppy_hashes = {
        puppy_blue   => { name => 'charlie', age => 4 },
        puppy_red    => { name => 'sam',     age => 9 },
        puppy_yellow => { name => 'jerry',   age => 2 },
        puppy_green  => { name => 'phil',    age => 5 },
    };

    for my $puppy ( MotherDogRobot->birth_puppies($puppy_hashes) ) {
        print join ' ', $puppy, $puppy->name, $puppy->age, $puppy->dump, "\n";
    }
}

BEGIN {
    package Puppy;
    BEGIN { $INC{'Puppy.pm'} = __FILE__; }
    use Any::Moose;
    has 'name' => ( is => 'rw', isa => 'Str' );
    has 'age'  => ( is => 'rw', isa => 'Int' );

    package MotherDogRobot;
    BEGIN { $INC{'MotherDogRobot.pm'} = __FILE__; }
    use Moose;
    use Puppy;

    sub init_puppy {
        my ( $self, %options ) = @_;
        my $puppy = Puppy->new(%options);
        return ($puppy);
    }

    sub birth_puppies {
        my ( $self, $puppy_hashes ) = @_;
        my @puppies = map { $self->init_puppy( %{$_} ) } values %$puppy_hashes;
        return (@puppies);
    }
    no Moose;
}
share|improve this answer
    
oooh.... my @puppies = map { $self->init_puppy( %{$_} ) } values %$puppy_hashes; hmmm.... thanks ^_^ let me try that. btw what does this do? BEGIN { $INC{'MotherDogRobot.pm'} = FILE; } –  qodeninja Oct 11 '11 at 8:30
1  
it makes "use Puppy;" work in a single-file, so anyone copy/pasting doesn't have to create a Puppy.pm... by hand, or learn to use diff/patch, see perldoc -f use and perldoc -f require, and Inline::Module/fatpack –  chuckl Oct 11 '11 at 8:55
1  
Why use Puppy at all? The package is already loaded (it's in the same file) and Puppy doesn't export anything (no need to call Puppy->import), so neither of the things done by use are relevant. –  Dave Sherohman Oct 11 '11 at 10:29
    
Because the OP had use Puppy;, because a lot of copy/paste-ers out there don't engage their noodle -- and it works –  chuckl Oct 11 '11 at 10:39

The standard Moose constructor will accept both

->new( %{ $puppy_hashes->{$_} } )

and

->new( $puppy_hashes->{$_} )

if $puppy_hashes contains what you say it does, and $_ is an existing key.

Furthermore, Moose will not give the error Error odd number of argments when you pass no arguments. (You're not assigning anything to %config.)

I can't tell which part of what you said is wrong, but what you said doesn't add up.

share|improve this answer
    
-- I'm not passing the hash directly to new as you've illustrated. its actually ->new(%options) -- I think the problem is with this ->new( %options ) in that when I pass %options, it's actually a reference and not a hash, so when I'm in the birth_puppies() sub trying to pass the hash I'm not dereferencing it properly by the time it gets to puppy->new() -- in any case this isnt per se an issue on discovering how I've done it wrong -- moreso how do I do this right? what I have up is as far as I've gotten with it, and I'm stuck! –  qodeninja Oct 11 '11 at 8:49
    
@nodebunny, When I replied, %options was always empty. With your changes, %{ $puppy_hashes->{$_} } will do. –  ikegami Oct 11 '11 at 9:20
2  
@nodebunny, Personally, I'd use my $self = shift; return Puppy->new(@_);. No need for an intermediary. –  ikegami Oct 11 '11 at 9:23

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