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Basically, what I'm trying to do, is what has been discussed many times already. However, most examples feature only ClassA inheriting from ClassB. My situation is quite trivial, however doesn't seem to be addressed in the JavaScript topics that I have found.

ClassB extends ClassA, which has a member. ClassC and ClassD extend ClassB. However, when setting the only member in an instance of ClassC, this member is also set in members of ClassD. Let's look at an example:

function ClassA(data) {
        var This = this;
        This._data = {};

        This._construct = function(data) {
            if( undefined === data ) {
                This._data = {};
                return true;
            }

            This._data = data;
        }


        This._construct(data);
    }

    function ClassB() {
    }
    ClassB.prototype = new ClassA();
    ClassB.prototype.constructor = ClassB;

    function ClassC() { // Extends ClassB
    }
    ClassC.prototype = new ClassB();
    ClassC.prototype.constructor = ClassC;

    function ClassD() { // Extends ClassB
    }
    ClassD.prototype = new ClassB();
    ClassD.prototype.constructor = ClassD;


    var objectC = new ClassC();
    var objectD = new ClassD();

    objectC._data['somevar'] = 'asdasdasd';
    console.log(objectC._data); // Object { somevar="asdasdasd"}
    console.log(objectD._data); // Object { somevar="asdasdasd"}

If you set a breakpoint on line console.log(objectC._data);, you may see in the Watch window of FireBug that all prototypes are set correctly. It's really strange, because it is clear that the prototypes of ClassC and ClassD are separate instances created with the new keyword, and thus should not share members. Can someone explain please?

The _construct() function can be removed from ClassA, with no effect. The var This = this line can be removed, and all consequent references to This can be changed to this, with no effect.

share|improve this question
    
Problem solved. For those geeks, who really like to know what they're doing, see this amazing article. I use jQuery, so this plugin looks like the right solution. – XedinUnknown Oct 11 '11 at 9:31
    
Ok, this plugin is rubbish, full of bugs, and looks like it's abandoned by the author. Instead, check out this one – XedinUnknown Oct 12 '11 at 8:32

You need to have a call to super in each class, to have this pattern work. This is how you can ao it.

//Simplifying the construction part a bit.
function ClassA(data) {
    this._data = data || {};
}

function ClassB(data) {
    ClassA.call(this, data); //call super class (ClassA) constructor
    //here you can initialize any ClassB specific variables
}
ClassB.prototype = new ClassA();
ClassB.prototype.constructor = ClassB;

function ClassC(data) { // Extends ClassB
    ClassB.call(this, data); //call super class (ClassB) constructor
    //here you can initialize any ClassC specific variables
}
ClassC.prototype = new ClassB();
ClassC.prototype.constructor = ClassC;

function ClassD(data) { // Extends ClassB
    ClassB.call(this, data); //call super class (ClassB) constructor
    //here you can initialize any ClassD specific variables
}
ClassD.prototype = new ClassB();
ClassD.prototype.constructor = ClassD;


var objectC = new ClassC();
var objectD = new ClassD();

objectC._data['somevar'] = 'asdasdasd';

console.log(objectC._data); // Object { somevar="asdasdasd"}
console.log(objectD._data); // Object {}  -- empty for objectD

Now you can see that _data is not shared across instances.

share|improve this answer
    
What's the difference between _data = {} and x = 'testmember'..? I don't see any difference. However, the article that I posted as a comment to the original post explains this in detail. – XedinUnknown Oct 12 '11 at 8:31
    
@XedinUnknown I am just pointing out that x is not shared across instances while _data is shared across. The difference being _data is a "object" and x is a "string". And again, I am not totally sure as to why this happens. BTW, the article you posted is good. Thanks for that. – Narendra Yadala Oct 12 '11 at 8:57
    
In your specific case, this is so because in JavaScript, primitive types are passed by value, and objects are passed by reference. However, because when building more or less complex applications we need consistent reliable behaviour, your method is not a solutions - simply because it is not a method. If I need an object, I can't just use a primitive. – XedinUnknown Oct 12 '11 at 12:57
    
@XedinUnknown Got it. I updated the answer accordingly to include a call to super. You can now see that _data is no longer shared across instances. – Narendra Yadala Oct 12 '11 at 13:56

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