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I am a java beginner. Please help me, what is wrong with this code :

public class Test {
  char[] alfa;
  Test(){
    alfa = {'a','b'};
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Test t = new Test();
    System.out.println(t.alfa[0]);
  }
}

Thank you,

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2  
Maybe you should try to compile it. –  default locale Oct 11 '11 at 8:50
2  
Welcome to SO! If this is homework, please add the appropriate tag. If you have further information (for instance, why do you suspect that anything is wrong with this code), please add it, so we an help you better. –  Björn Pollex Oct 11 '11 at 8:51

4 Answers 4

You can't do:

alfa = {'a','b'};

It should be:

alfa = new char[]{'a','b'};

The short hand notation can only be used when you declare the array, like this:

char[] alfa = {'a','b'};
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You can only use array constants in initializers, i.e.,

char[] alfa = { 'a', 'b' };

Otherwise, you have to use new, like so:

alfa = new char[] { 'a', 'b' };
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You can try this way :

public class Test
{
 private char[] alpha;
 public char[] getAlpha()
 {
  return this.alpha;
 }
 public Test(){
  this.alpha = new char[]{'a','b'};
 }
 public static void main(String[] args) {
  Test t = new Test();
  System.out.println(t.getAlfa()[0]);
 }
}
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In this line:

alfa = {'a','b'};

You'll get an Array constants can only be used in initializers compiler error. You should be initializing the char[] like this:

alfa = new char[]{'a','b'};

Or alternatively initialize it at declaration time

char[] alfa = {'a', 'b'};

Take a look at the Arrays Chapter in the Java Tutorials, in particular the "Creating, Initializing, and Accessing an Array" section.

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