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I'm looking for ways to 'publish' a method in one interface to another interface, but hide it for others.

I have the following interfaces

public interface IFirst
{
  void Forbidden();
}

public interface ISecond
{
  void Test(IFirst first);
}

internal class Second : ISecond 
{
  void Test(IFirst first)
  {
    first.Forbidden();
  }
}

As you can see, implementations of ISecond need to call method 'Forbidden' on IFirst. However, I do not want to allow classes in another assembly to call 'Forbidden' on implementations of IFirst. What can I do to hide this method from the outside world but still allowing implementations of ISecond to use it?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't think there is anything you can do about this if you want to interfaces, as if you want a public method of ISecond to take a parameter of IFirst then IFirst must be public and so must all its methods, so users of IFirst could always call the methods.

You could test the implementation of IFirst you are given to see if it implements another internal interface, but unless you are in control of dishing out the implementations of IFirst that are being passed in this is not guaranteed to work (and is not guaranteed to work even if you are in control of dishing out the instances) as someone could always pass in some other implementation which doesn't implement the internal interface.

You might be able to do it by using an abstract base class instead, but I haven't tested this, just an idea:

public abstract class FirstBase
{
   protected internal abstract void Forbidden();
}

public interface ISecond
{
  void Test(FirstBase first);
}

internal class Second : ISecond 
{
  void Test(FirstBase first)
  {
    first.Forbidden();
  }
}
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Although I really like both solutions (thanks Sam and Thomas!) I've chosen this solution for now. Specifying that method ISecond.Test() requires an instance of IFirst while in fact it requires a more specific interface makes the use of the ISecond interface less valuable: It creates the suggestion that an IFirst is 'sufficient' which is not true. Of course the use of an abstract base class has disadvantages too (if only because it is an extra layer between interface and actual implementation and it does not allow multiple inheritance), it's more clear to the 'outside' world (other assemblies). –  Ronald Oct 13 '11 at 18:18

Put the Forbidden method in another, non-public interface:

public interface IFirst
{
  // whatever ...
}

internal interface IPrivate : IFirst
{
    void Forbidden();
}

public interface ISecond
{
  void Test(IFirst first);
}

internal class Second : ISecond 
{
  void Test(IFirst first)
  {
    var priv = first as IPrivate;
    if (priv != null)
        priv.Forbidden();
  }
}
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I would derive IPrivate from IFirst though and require that every IPrivate is also an IFirst. –  Andreas Oct 11 '11 at 9:07
    
@DonAndre, yes, that was my intention but I forgot it while typing... thanks for pointing it out –  Thomas Levesque Oct 11 '11 at 9:10
    
whilst this would work if all instances of IFirst also implement IPrivate, there is nothing to stop someone using an implementation of IFirst which does not implement IPrivate, and then this would not work –  Sam Holder Oct 11 '11 at 9:13
    
I do like the idea of creating an internal, derived interface but Sam is right: Then there's still no way to guarantee that Test() gets actually passed an IPrivate instance.I'd like to have a way to state the requirement for IPrivate (so in a way, a requirement for the Forbidden method) so ISecond.Test is guaranteed to receive an IPrivate, but at the same time I want to forbid others to use the Forbidden method... –  Ronald Oct 11 '11 at 10:25
    
Well, there's no way to make interface members non-public, so I guess you're stuck... I'm afraid there's no ideal solution. –  Thomas Levesque Oct 11 '11 at 10:27

have a look at the internal keyword and the internalsvisibleto attribute. with those combined you should be able to do what you want. mind you: this applies to all internals of your assembly.

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I've read the documentation you mentioned thoroughly. However, I think that solely using access modifiers is not possible here since they would need to apply to the Forbidden()-method... which is an interface method so access modifiers are not allowed (I would love to have it allowed, though :-) ) –  Ronald Oct 13 '11 at 18:13
    
well it wasn't apparent from your sample code that IFirst would contain other methods as well for which it needs to be public. if that is the case I could still recommend this but with IFirst split up into 'internal IFirstForbidden' and 'public IFirst'. –  mtijn Oct 14 '11 at 7:44

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