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Okay, so I realised after writing some overloaded methods that webmethods can't be overloaded (by realised I mean VS threw a paddy and wouldn't allow me to update the service references). I have tried to get around that like this:

    public string DoPing<T>(T IP)
    {

        if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
        { 
            return DoPingString(IP);
        }
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(IPAddress))
        {
            return DoPingIP(IP);
        }
        throw new Exception("Programmer Error");
    }

But I'm getting a cannot convert from T to string/Ipadress error when I call the respective (renamed) methods. Can someone explain why it doesn't work, and possibly either fix it or give me an alternate solution? Thanks in advance.

Edit: Good point, generics are probably overkill (I tried for another solution and failed before trying this). DoPingString(string String) and DoPingIP(IPAdress Address) are the signatures. I will give the tick to the closest answer tomorrow. I solved the problem in a separate way.

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1  
XML Web Services right? if overload is not supported how come you guess generics are supported? To my knowledge you really need to create different method signatures, meaning different method names and no generics... –  Davide Piras Oct 11 '11 at 9:27
1  
Also, the generics here gives no particular benefit over using an object argument, really. –  Grant Thomas Oct 11 '11 at 9:28
    
Show the signature of DoPingString and DoPingIP please. –  VdesmedT Oct 11 '11 at 9:29
2  
You can't have generic parameters in a web method. Everything is sent as strings, so the framework has to know the type that you want. It can't guess what data type it could possibly convert the string to. –  Guffa Oct 11 '11 at 9:34
    
You can't expose generics in web services but you can use WebMethodAttribute. –  Seb Oct 11 '11 at 9:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're not using generics the way it was intended. The compiler has no idea what type T is, so it won't just let you implicitly or explicitly cast to String or IPAddress. Here's a version that works:

    public string DoPing<T>(T IP)
    {
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
        {
            return DoPingString((String)Convert.ChangeType(IP, typeof(String)));
        }
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(IPAddress))
        {
            return DoPingIP((IPAddress)Convert.ChangeType(IP, typeof(IPAddress)));
        }
        throw new Exception("Programmer Error");
    }

However, since you're using generics with no constraint, you gain no benefit from the generic implementation. Why not just take an object?

public string DoPing(Object IP)
{
    if (IP.GetType() == typeof(string))
    {
        return DoPingString((String)IP);
    }
    if (IP.GetType() == typeof(IPAddress))
    {
        return DoPingIP((IPAddress)IP);
    }
    throw new Exception("Programmer Error");
}

Of course, the simpler and easier approach would be to simply overload your function, i.e.:

public string DoPing(string IP)
{
    return DoPingString(IP);
}
public string DoPing(IPAddress IP)
{
    return DoPingIP(IP);
}
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1  
The OP said that he tried overloading first, but it didn't work with his RPC library. –  CodesInChaos Oct 11 '11 at 9:49
    
Your second answer was similar to what I eventually did. –  Sean Oct 12 '11 at 9:28

It sounds like you want the KnownTypeAttribute available in WCF. But seeing as you can't use that here and you definitely want only one method then I think the only way is to just offer two parameters. Just add some validation to check for nulls and pass them on to your private helper methods.

[WebMethod] 
public string DoPing(string ipString, IPAddress ipAdress)
{
    if(ipString != null)
    {
        DoPing(ipString);
    }
    if(ipAdress != null)
    {
        DoPing(ipAdress);
    }
}
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You can use WebMethodAttribute :

[WebMethod(MessageName = "DoPingIPAddress")]
public string DoPing(IPAddress ip) { }

[WebMethod(MessageName = "DoPingString")]
public string DoPing(string ip) { }

But from the client side, you'll have two different methods : it's web services/SOAP constraints.

Documentation

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The idea was to use one function from the client side to multiple functions on the server side. Thank you though, I have learnt something new. –  Sean Oct 11 '11 at 9:52
1  
Ok, so I'm afraid you can't achieve this with web services. Maybe using WCF you can find something that matches requirement :-) –  Seb Oct 11 '11 at 9:55

I would better do this:

public string DoPing(IPAddress ip)
{
    ...logic...
}

public string DoPing(String ip)
{
    ...logic...
}

Try to avoid unnecessary patterns and templates.

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1  
That looks pretty similar to overloading. Are you sure you read the question? –  Buh Buh Oct 11 '11 at 9:38

Try using Convert.ChangeType method then cast as usual:

if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
{ 
    return DoPingString((string)Convert.ChangeType(IP, typeof(string)));
}
if (typeof(T) == typeof(IPAddress))
{
   return DoPingIP((IPAddress)Convert.ChangeType(IP, typeof(IPAddress)));
}
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