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My application used BackgroundWorker for uploading a file to FTP server. Everything works ok but it seems OnProgressChanged event does not work as the way it should be.

I though that OnProgressChanged will completely finish after RunWorkerCompleted event fired, but it's not.

In my case, OnProgressChanged event is still firing though the RunWorkerComplete is fired. Obviously, my progress bar is still moving on while my file is already sent completely to the ftp server.

I tested on my debugging mode and I see that after RunWorkerCompleted Fired, OnPorgressChanged is still working.

My code is here.

 void FTP_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        BackgroundWorker bw = sender as BackgroundWorker;
        try
        {
            string filename = e.Argument.ToString();
            if (filename != string.Empty)
            { 
                FileInfo fileInf = new FileInfo(filename);
                FtpWebRequest reqFTP;
                if (!IsFolderExist(_defaultDir))
                {
                    MakeDefaultDir(_defaultDir);
                }

                reqFTP = GetRequest(this._host, this._port, GetDirName(_defaultDir) + "/" + fileInf.Name, this._user, this._pass);
                reqFTP.KeepAlive = false;
                reqFTP.Method = WebRequestMethods.Ftp.UploadFile;
                reqFTP.UseBinary = true;
                reqFTP.ContentLength = fileInf.Length;

                long FileSize = fileInf.Length;
                string FileSizeDescription = GetFileSize(FileSize);



                int ChunkSize = 4096, NumRetries = 0, MaxRetries = 50;
                long SentBytes = 0;
                byte[] Buffer = new byte[ChunkSize]; 
                int BytesRead = 0;


                using (Stream requestStream = reqFTP.GetRequestStream())
                {

                    using (FileStream fs = File.Open(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.ReadWrite))
                    {
                         BytesRead = fs.Read(Buffer, 0, ChunkSize); // read the first chunk in the buffer
                        while (BytesRead > 0)
                        {
                            try
                            {
                                if (bw.CancellationPending)
                                    return;

                                requestStream.Write(Buffer, 0, BytesRead);


                                SentBytes += BytesRead;

                                // Here is progress information
                                string SummaryText = String.Format("Transferred {0} / {1}", GetFileSize(SentBytes), FileSizeDescription);
                                bw.ReportProgress((int)(((decimal)SentBytes / (decimal)FileSize) * 100), SummaryText);
                            }
                            catch (Exception ex)
                            {
                                Console.WriteLine("Exception: " + ex.ToString());
                                if (NumRetries++ < MaxRetries)
                                {
                                    fs.Position -= BytesRead;
                                }
                                else
                                {
                                    throw new Exception(String.Format("Error occurred during upload, too many retries. \n{0}", ex.ToString()));
                                }
                            }
                            BytesRead = fs.Read(Buffer, 0, ChunkSize);  
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            if (OnFTPError != null)
            {
                OnFTPError(this, "Error was handled in Replaced File Uploading :" + ex.Message);
            }
        }     
    }

Any ideas on this issues? Thanks guys

share|improve this question
1  
That's not supposed to happen. Please show some code. –  Daniel Hilgarth Oct 11 '11 at 10:12
1  
Is there any possibility that the later raises of OnProgressChanged actually happened earlier but were batched up as messages on the main thread since the main thread was bussy with something else? –  Polity Oct 11 '11 at 10:36
    
@Polity I am not sure about this. But in my case I do nothing until RunWorkerCompleted is fired. So, in this case, my status is completely sent but my progress bar still moving. –  Apichart Thanomkiet Oct 11 '11 at 10:44
    
How many Progress events does your code generate? It should not be much over 100. If it's tens of thousands then @Polly's scenario makes sense. –  Henk Holterman Oct 11 '11 at 10:53
    
I'm sure it will not generate more than 100 events –  Apichart Thanomkiet Oct 11 '11 at 11:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is most likely caused by an artifact introduced by the Vista update for the native progress bar component, also present in Windows 7. To see it, start a new Winforms project and drop a progress bar and a button on a form. Double click the button and make the Click event handler look like this:

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        if (progressBar1.Value == progressBar1.Maximum) progressBar1.Value = progressBar1.Minimum;
        else progressBar1.Value = progressBar1.Maximum;
    }

Press F5 and click the button. Note how the bar is animated, it smoothly moves from 0 to 100. Takes about a second.

Perhaps you see the implication now, this animation produces lag. In other words, the visible value is always less than the programmed Value unless you give it enough time to catch up. You don't, you're constantly updating the value with your ProgressChanged event handler.

Unfortunately, they forgot to provide an option to turn this animation off. There's a trick however, the animation is disabled by default for decrements. What you can do is set the Value property twice, first to value+1, then to value. The bar instantly jumps to the programmed value. The only flaw with it is that you can't easily jump to 100%.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I don't know this before, you just made me realize this thing. Thanks, by the way, the trick is just to set the progressbar property value+1 and then set the progressbar value to the program value? –  Apichart Thanomkiet Oct 11 '11 at 12:57
    
You can fake 100% by making the min/max of the progress bar, say, 0/1000 and then the human eye can't see the difference between 99.9% and 100.0%. –  David Heffernan Oct 15 '11 at 21:23
    
@David - my screen is 1600 pixels wide, still off by one :) Programmers do get nuts about details like this. Rightfully so. –  Hans Passant Oct 15 '11 at 21:51
    
Both of mine are 1920 wide! Unusual to have full screen prog bar. Use 10000 then. Of course these are the details that only we see but users don't care about! P.S. Isn't this trick one of the vanishingly small number of things about Windows that I have introduced you to?! –  David Heffernan Oct 15 '11 at 21:59
    
Hehe, it's a blend of our knowledge I guess. Good thing. –  Hans Passant Oct 15 '11 at 22:34

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