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Let's say that I want to implement some classes for containers. All of them should implement such functions like insert, remove etc. So I write some interface:

template <class T>
class ContainerInterface {
public:
   virtual void insert(T element) = 0;

   template<class Predicate>
   virtual void remove(Predicate p) = 0; 
};

Now I can write something like:

template <class T>
class MyVector : public ContainerInterface<T>{};

template <class T>
class MyList : public ContainerInterface<T>{};

And I am sure that MyVector and MyList must implement functions insert and remove. However, there is the error:

error: templates may not be ‘virtual’

It comes from:

template<class Predicate>
virtual void remove(Predicate p) = 0; 

I don't know the Predicate when I define some container and I dont'see any sense to bind deleter object to container class, for example one time I can pass Predicate to delete integers less than 50 and other time I want delete even integers. What can be done in such case - to declare some templated thing in base class and simulate virtual behaviour of function?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use type erasure with function objects. But luckily, the appropriate facilities already exist! For example, in your case, you could use boost::function<bool(const T&)> or std::function<bool(const T&)> (with TR1/C++11 support) as your predicate type!

virtual void remove(std::function<bool(const T&)> p);
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Create some abstract class Predicate, which all concrete predicates will have to inherit from. Then, just make the predicate an argument to the function:

virtual void remove(Predicate* p) = 0;

You'll have to make the relevant Predicate member functions virtual of course, and let every concrete implementation override them.

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