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I'm having a very simple program that outputs simple JSON string that I manually concatenate together and output through the std::cout stream (the output really is that simple) but I have strings that could contain double-quotes, curly-braces and other characters that could break the JSON string. So I need a library (or a function more accurately) to escape strings accordingly to the JSON standard, as lightweight as possible, nothing more, nothing less.

I found a few libraries that are used to encode whole objects into JSON but having in mind my program is 900 line cpp file, I rather want to not rely on a library that is few times bigger then my program just to achieve something as simple as this.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Here's a very simple start, it doesn't handle invalid unicode characters though. If you don't expect any of them in your output, feel free to use this...

#include <string>
#include <sstream>

std::string escapeJsonString(const std::string& input) {
    std::ostringstream ss;
    for (auto iter = input.cbegin(); iter != input.cend(); iter++) {
    //C++98/03:
    //for (std::string::const_iterator iter = input.begin(); iter != input.end(); iter++) {
        switch (*iter) {
            case '\\': ss << "\\\\"; break;
            case '"': ss << "\\\""; break;
            case '/': ss << "\\/"; break;
            case '\b': ss << "\\b"; break;
            case '\f': ss << "\\f"; break;
            case '\n': ss << "\\n"; break;
            case '\r': ss << "\\r"; break;
            case '\t': ss << "\\t"; break;
            default: ss << *iter; break;
        }
    }
    return ss.str();
}
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Exactly what I needed, in order to compile it just needed "input.begin() and input.end()" instead of cbegin/cend and the iterator had to be std::string::const_iterator instead of "auto". –  Veseliq Oct 11 '11 at 12:42
    
I forgot to mention that I wrote it with C++11 features enabled, sorry. –  simfoo Oct 12 '11 at 9:51
    
thanks for this ;)... Just to mention, in C++11 you should replace "const std::string& input" with "std::string input" and the for loop with "for(auto c : input)". Then you also need to replace "*iter" with "c". Nothing important but makes it look nicer and easier to understand. –  thesaint Oct 17 '12 at 17:09
1  
Why should I pass the input string as value? Most std::string implementations will copy the whole string and not just a pointer and this is quite inefficient when I just need to iterate through it. As for the iterator, that's just a matter of style imho. –  simfoo Oct 18 '12 at 13:48
    
why does '/' need escaping? –  deathApril Nov 27 '13 at 18:20
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Here is what I wrote and use, it does not copy the whole string like simfoo's one does, but replaces the necessary parts in-place.

string & escapeJSON(string &str)
{
    str.erase
    (
        remove_if
        (
            str.begin(),
            str.end(),
            [](const char c)
            {
                return (c <= 31);
            }
        ),
        str.end()
    );
    size_t pos=0;
    while((pos=str.find_first_of("\"\\/", pos))!=string::npos)
    {
        str.insert(pos, "\\");
        ++++pos;
    }
    return str;
}

P.S. In Pre-C++11 or C, you should replace ++++pos; with pos+=2;

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1  
"In Pre-C++11 or C, you should replace ++++pos; with pos+=2;" This is really awesome. Nothing againts C++11, I think it's great. But just because a language has a feature doesn't mean its good to use it. As a matter of fact, you should always prefer "pos+=2", because EVERYONE knows what it means, while you have to lookup "++++pos" first and it is not even short, but longer... WTF? Using all fancy language features doesn't make you look more intelligent.The rest also isn't pleasing. And then YOU should know that in C++11, you neither pass string by "&" nor return by "&". But by plain values –  thesaint Oct 17 '12 at 16:56
2  
Another question is whether this function is faster at all. It would be, IF the replacements would be of the same length, but in fact they aren't. To me this function has a maintainability index of zero ;). Even though you might have had fun developing it, I'll give you that! –  thesaint Oct 17 '12 at 17:08
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I have written a simple JSON escape and unescaped functions. The code is public available in GitHub. For anyone interested here is the code:

enum State {ESCAPED, UNESCAPED};

std::string escapeJSON(const std::string& input)
{
    std::string output;
    output.reserve(input.length());

    for (std::string::size_type i = 0; i < input.length(); ++i)
    {
        switch (input[i]) {
            case '"':
                output += "\\\"";
                break;
            case '/':
                output += "\\/";
                break;
            case '\b':
                output += "\\b";
                break;
            case '\f':
                output += "\\f";
                break;
            case '\n':
                output += "\\n";
                break;
            case '\r':
                output += "\\r";
                break;
            case '\t':
                output += "\\t";
                break;
            case '\\':
                output += "\\\\";
                break;
            default:
                output += input[i];
                break;
        }

    }

    return output;
}

std::string unescapeJSON(const std::string& input)
{
    State s = UNESCAPED;
    std::string output;
    output.reserve(input.length());

    for (std::string::size_type i = 0; i < input.length(); ++i)
    {
        switch(s)
        {
            case ESCAPED:
                {
                    switch(input[i])
                    {
                        case '"':
                            output += '\"';
                            break;
                        case '/':
                            output += '/';
                            break;
                        case 'b':
                            output += '\b';
                            break;
                        case 'f':
                            output += '\f';
                            break;
                        case 'n':
                            output += '\n';
                            break;
                        case 'r':
                            output += '\r';
                            break;
                        case 't':
                            output += '\t';
                            break;
                        case '\\':
                            output += '\\';
                            break;
                        default:
                            output += input[i];
                            break;
                    }

                    s = UNESCAPED;
                    break;
                }
            case UNESCAPED:
                {
                    switch(input[i])
                    {
                        case '\\':
                            s = ESCAPED;
                            break;
                        default:
                            output += input[i];
                            break;
                    }
                }
        }
    }
    return output;
}
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I know enums are pretty, but wouldn't a boolean have sufficed? –  Phillip Elm Jan 6 at 9:27
    
Sure. Thanks for the comment. –  mariolpantunes Jan 7 at 16:49
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JsonCpp.

Yes, it's a fully-featured JSON library; but, no, you don't have to use all of its features.

Are you unable to access Google today?

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Was the last line of your answer really needed? Yeah, I was able to use Google and there wasn't a simple straight forward function that does just what I needed it to do and the libraries that have escaping mechanisms (including yours) tend to have internal references that make it hard (for me) to just extract what I need. What is the problem with asking others here, so that if someone have stumbled into simple thing that helps me do what I want to, to just point me (and hopefully others later with same/similar problem) to it? –  Veseliq Oct 11 '11 at 11:52
    
@Veseliq: Yes, it was needed. Somebody needed to point out to you that you are expected to put some effort into researching your problem before asking. You are not supposed to "extract what you need": use the library properly, as demonstrated in its documentation, but just stop worrying about all the bits that you don't use. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 11 '11 at 12:15
2  
Smugly telling people to use Google on a Q&A site sort of defeats the purpose, especially when you don't even answer the question (a simple escape function rather than a whole library). –  Preston May 7 '12 at 17:56
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