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Using sed, how do I return the last occurance of a match until the End Of File? (FYI this has been simplified)

So far I've tried:

sed -n '/ Statistics |/,$p' logfile.log

Which returns all lines from the first match onwards (almost the entire file)

I've also tried:

$linenum=`tail -400 logfile.log | grep -n " Statistics |" | tail -1 | cut -d: -f1`
sed "$linenum,\$!d" logfile.log

This works but won't work over an ssh connection in one command, really need it all to be in one pipeline.

Format of the log file is as follows:

(There are statistics headers with sub data written to the log file every minute, the purpose of this command is to return the most recent Statistics header together with any associated errors that occur after the header)

Statistics |
   Stuff
   More Stuff
   Even more Stuff
Statistics |
   Stuff
   More Stuff
Error: incorrect value
Statistics |
   Stuff
   More Stuff
   Even more Stuff
Statistics |
   Stuff
Error: error type one
Error: error type two

EOF

Return needs to be:

Statistics |
   Stuff
Error: error type one
Error: error type two
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you have tac available:

tac INPUTFILE | sed '/^Statistics |/q' | tac
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Wow, this is even better. I was working with the above regex but couldn't get it to pass the !H and $!b without an error via ssh. –  f2s Oct 12 '11 at 10:09
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Your example script has a space before Statistics but your sample data doesn't seem to. This has a regex which assumes Statistics is at beginning of line; tweak if that's incorrect.

sed -n '/^Statistics |/h;/^Statistics |/!H;$!b;x;p'

When you see Statistics, replace the hold space with the current line (h). Otherwise, append to the hold space (H). If we are not at the end of file, stop here (b). At end of file, print out the hold space (x retrieve contents of hold space; p print).

In a sed script, commands are optionally prefixed by an "address". Most commonly this is a regex, but it can also be a line number. The address /^Statistics |/ selects all lines matching the regular expression; /^Statistics |/! selects lines not matching the regular expression; and $! matches all lines except the last line in the file. Commands with no explicit address are executed for all input lines.

Edit Explain the script in some more detail, and add the following.

Note that if you need to pass this to a remote host using ssh, you will need additional levels of quoting. One possible workaround if it gets too complex is to store this script on the remote host, and just ssh remotehost path/to/script. Another possible workaround is to change the addressing expressions so that they don't contain any exclamation marks (these are problematic on the command line e.g. in Bash).

sed -n '/^Statistics |/{h;b};H;${x;p}'

This is somewhat simpler, too!

A third possible workaround, if your ssh pipeline's stdin is not tied up for other things, is to pipe in the script from your local host.

echo '/^Statistics |/h;/^Statistics |/!H;$!b;x;p' |
ssh remotehost sed -n -f - file
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Thanks tripleee, this worked perfectly! Have literally no idea after using regex for 4-5 years what the h,!H,$!b;x or p flags mean but you're a star! –  f2s Oct 11 '11 at 11:14
    
This is not regex, these are sed command names. The paragraph after the script is a human readable translation. Read the sed man page for a list of the available commands, or perhaps an on-line tutorial. Glad I could help; thanks for the accept! –  tripleee Oct 11 '11 at 17:55
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If you're happy with an awk solution, this kinda works (apart from getting an extra blank line):

awk '/^Statistics/ { buf = "" } { buf = buf "\n" $0 } END { print buf }' input.txt
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This might work for you:

sed '/Statistics/{h;d};H;$!d;x' file
Statistics |
   Stuff
Error: error type one
Error: error type two
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sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/.*Statistics/Statistics/g' INPUTFILE

should work (GNU sed 4.2.1).

It reads the whole file to one string, then replaces everything from the start to the last Statistics (word included) with Statistics, and prints what's remaining.

HTH

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This doesn't scale too well if the input file is large. –  tripleee Oct 14 '11 at 11:00
    
@tripleee Yeah, you're right. –  Zsolt Botykai Oct 14 '11 at 11:17
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