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Wordpress has great filter support for getting at all sorts of specific bits of content and modifying it before output. Like "the_content" filter, which lets you access the markup for a post before it's output to the screen.

I'm trying to find a catch-all filter that gives me one last crack at modifying the final markup in its entirety before output. Anyone know of one?

I've browsed the list of filters a number of times, but nothing jumps out at me: http://adambrown.info/p/wp_hooks/hook/filters

(I've tapped some Wordpress-specific communities for this question, but not having received a single reply, thought I'd turn to the venerable SO.)

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6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

AFAIK, there is no hook for this, since the themes uses HTML which won't be processed by WordPress.

You could, however, use output buffering to catch the final HTML:

<?php
// example from php.net
function callback($buffer) {
  // replace all the apples with oranges
  return (str_replace("apples", "oranges", $buffer));
}
ob_start("callback");
?>
<html><body>
<p>It's like comparing apples to oranges.</p>
</body></html>
<?php ob_end_flush(); ?>
/* output:
   <html><body>
   <p>It's like comparing oranges to oranges.</p>
   </body></html>
*/
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1  
You can use php register_shutdown_function to end buffering, and retrieve html. –  Syom Feb 11 '13 at 23:23

the question is maybe old, but i have found a better way to do it.

function callback($buffer) {
  // modify buffer here, and then return the updated code
  return $buffer;
}

function buffer_start() { ob_start("callback"); }

function buffer_end() { ob_end_flush(); }

add_action('wp_head', 'buffer_start');
add_action('wp_footer', 'buffer_end');

Explanation This plugin code registers two actions –buffer_startandbuffer_end`.

buffer_start is executed at the end of the header section of the html. The parameter, the callback function, is called at the end of the output buffering. This occurs at the footer of the page, when the second registered action, buffer_end, executes.

The callback function is where you add your code to change the value of the output (the $buffer variable). Then you simply return the modified code and the page will be displayed.

Notes Be sure to use unique function names for buffer_start, buffer_end, and callback, so they do not conflict with other functions you may have in plugins.

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1  
You can prefix or suffix your examples: buffer_start_so_772510 or so_772510_callback (I prefer to suffix, as it's easier to read). This way, when the code surfaces somewhere else, we know where it came from ;) –  brasofilo Jul 4 '13 at 15:50
    
this doesn't work when the things that you want to modify or remove exists after the footer element –  user225269 Dec 11 '13 at 1:35
    
I recommend using kwoodfriend's solution, because it's way much safer (for example you can be sure to be the very last one to manipulate the output). –  Robert Mar 12 at 16:23

WordPress doesn't have a "final output" filter, but you can hack together one. The below example resides within a "Must Use" plugin I've created for a project.

Note: I haven't tested with any plugins that might make use of the "shutdown" action.

The plugin works by iterating through all the open buffer levels, closing them and capturing their output. It then fires off the "final_output" filter, echoing the filtered content.

Sadly, WordPress performs almost the exact same process (closing the open buffers), but doesn't actually capture the buffer for filtering (just flushes it), so additional "shutdown" actions won't have access to it. Because of this, the below action is prioritized above WordPress's.

wp-content/mu-plugins/buffer.php

<?php

/**
 * Output Buffering
 *
 * Buffers the entire WP process, capturing the final output for manipulation.
 */

ob_start();

add_action('shutdown', function() {
    $final = '';

    // We'll need to get the number of ob levels we're in, so that we can iterate over each, collecting
    // that buffer's output into the final output.
    $levels = count(ob_get_level());

    for ($i = 0; $i < $levels; $i++)
    {
        $final .= ob_get_clean();
    }

    // Apply any filters to the final output
    echo apply_filters('final_output', $final);
}, 0);

An example of hooking into the final_output filter:

<?php

add_filter('final_output', function($output) {
    return str_replace('foo', 'bar', $output);
});
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1  
Note: I've only tested this in version 3.8. –  kwoodfriend Apr 2 '14 at 17:47
1  
Thank you very much, this is the most elegant solution. –  petermolnar Mar 4 at 12:05
    
Awesome, definitely by far most elegant! –  Robert Mar 12 at 16:11
    
I suggest to change the very last parameter of add_action from 0 to something bigger like 999 (from the codex: Lower numbers correspond with earlier execution (...)) to be sure to be the very last function to manipulate the output. –  Robert Mar 12 at 16:26
    
@Robert, if you do this, then WP's default action will run for the shutdown action, which will flush all of the ob levels. The default action does not capture the output, just flushes it, so the final_output filter will capture nothing. I believe, at least. –  kwoodfriend Mar 12 at 19:15

You might try looking in the wp-includes/formatting.php file. For example, the wpautop function. If you are looking for doing something with the entire page, look at the Super Cache plugin. That writes the final web page to a file for caching. Seeing how that plug-in works may give you some ideas.

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Indeed there was a discusussion recently on the WP-Hackers mailing list about the topic of full page modification and it seems the consensus was that output buffering with ob_start() etc was the only real solution. There was also some discussion about the upsides and downsides of it: http://groups.google.com/group/wp-hackers/browse_thread/thread/e1a6f4b29169209a#

To summarize: It works and is the best solution when necessary (like in the WP-Supercache plugin) but slows down overall speeds because your content isn't allowed to be sent to the browser as its ready, but instead has to wait for the full document to be rendered (for ob_end() ) before it can be processed by you and sent to the browser.

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@jacer, if you use the following hooks, the header.php also gets included.

function callback($buffer) {      
    $buffer = str_replace('replacing','width',$buffer);
    return $buffer; 
}

function buffer_start() { ob_start("callback"); } 
function buffer_end() { ob_end_flush(); }

add_action('after_setup_theme', 'buffer_start');
add_action('shutdown', 'buffer_end');
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Try not to make a post that references another answer (and requires reading the other answer to get the context); the more separated your answer gets from the answer you're referencing, the harder it is to understand what you're saying. Also, it's not necessarily bad to post an answer that builds off of the others, as long as you give credit where credit is due. –  Dennis Meng Oct 25 '14 at 23:40

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