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suppose I got a singleton class MySingleton as coded below.

Now is a singleton class just like any other class. I can have instance variables that are nonatomic and retain?

I can have: @property (nonatomic, retain) NSString* instanceVar in the .h file

and @synthesize instanceVar in the .m file?

static MySingleton* _sharedMySingleton = nil;

+(MySingleton*)sharedMySingleton
{
    @synchronized([MySingleton class])
    {
        if (!_sharedMySingleton)
            [[self alloc] init];

        return _sharedMySingleton;
    }

    return nil;
}

+(id)alloc
{
    @synchronized([MySingleton class])
    {
        NSAssert(_sharedMySingleton == nil, @"Attempted to allocate a second instance of a singleton.");
        _sharedMySingleton = [super alloc];
        return _sharedMySingleton;
    }

    return nil;
}
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Want to note that ARC will break existing Singleton implementations. They recommend using ARC to implement similar from now on. –  Daryl Teo Oct 11 '11 at 11:33
    
You should use dispatch_once instead @synchronized, it's 20x faster. –  Jano Oct 11 '11 at 11:42
    
If you're going to be multithreading then you want your singleton properties to be atomic to avoid race conditions (as well as wrapping the critical sections of your code with @synchronized directives). –  jbat100 Oct 11 '11 at 12:06
    
@Daryl: What is ARC? –  Henley Chiu Oct 11 '11 at 13:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, the instance of a singleton class behaves the same as a standard class, there is just one instance.

The pattern you have is overly complicated, there is no need for +(id)alloc Here is a simplier pattern:

@implementation MySingleton
static MySingleton* _sharedMySingleton = nil;

+(MySingleton*)sharedMySingleton
{
    @synchronized([MySingleton class])
    {
        if (!_sharedMySingleton)
            _sharedSingleton = [[MySingleton alloc] init];
    }

    return _sharedMySingleton;
}
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You bet. To the rest of your application, your singleton looks and works just like any other class. The only difference is that when your application tries to create a new singleton it always receives back the same object. But the singleton can have instance methods and instance variables just like any other class.

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Not familiar with the annotations you mentioned because I'm a C++ developer, but a singleton can certainly have instance data. That's one of its values.

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Yes you can have instance variables, a singleton is simply a regular class, where there is only one instance at any given time.

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