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I need to compare two Lists of Rules of form var -> integer on the fact of mismatch.
To determine, if there are any rules the same by lhs and different by rhs.

For example:

{a->3, b->1, c->4} ~ ??? ~ {a->3, b->1, c->4} = true
{a->3, b->1, c->4} ~ ??? ~ {a->3, b->2, c->4} = false
{a->3, b->1, c->4} ~ ??? ~ {a->1, b->3, c->4} = false
{a->3, b->1, c->4} ~ ??? ~ {c->4, d->8, e->9} = true
{a->3, b->1, c->4} ~ ??? ~ {d->8, e->9, f->7} = true

In my case they are already sorted by lhs and all lhs are unique if it could help to make as simple function as possible.

UPD: forgot one thing! Lists can be of different length. But seems like all three current answers are still valid.

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's another solution:

In[12]:= check[a:{__Rule}, b:{__Rule}] := FilterRules[a, b] === FilterRules[b, a]

In[18]:= {{a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}~check ~ {a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4} ,
 {a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}~check ~ {a -> 3, b -> 2, c -> 4},
 {a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}~check ~ {a -> 1, b -> 3, c -> 4},
 {a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}~check ~ {c -> 4, d -> 8, e -> 9},
 {a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}~check ~ {d -> 8, e -> 9, f -> 7}}

Out[18]= {True, False, False, True, True}

(This relies on the fact that the lists of options are already sorted.)

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In addition to size, this solution is 3 times faster on my data, than other two. –  Nakilon Oct 11 '11 at 14:58
    
@Nakilon If speed is an issue, wrap rules on the r.h.s. of /. in Dispatch - this should speed the code up, both for my version(s) and @Heike's. –  Leonid Shifrin Oct 11 '11 at 15:10
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You could do something like

check[{a__Rule}, {b__Rule}] := 
 Module[{common = Intersection[{a}[[All, 1]], {b}[[All, 1]]]},
  SameQ[common /. {a}, common /. {b}]]

Then

check[{a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}, {a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}]
check[{a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}, {a -> 3, b -> 2, c -> 4}]
check[{a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}, {a -> 1, b -> 3, c -> 4}]

yields

True
False
False
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+1 That's exactly the approach I came up with (but a half hour after you!). –  David Carraher Oct 11 '11 at 13:12
    
+1 This solution may be easily generalized for empty sets of rules by replacing BlankSequence (__) with BlankNullSequence (___): check[{a___Rule}, {b___Rule}] := .... –  Alexey Popkov Oct 11 '11 at 13:23
    
What a difference between check[{a__Rule}, {b__Rule}] := and check[a, b] :=? –  Nakilon Oct 11 '11 at 13:28
1  
@Nakilon Please read corresponding Documentation pages: "Making Definitions for Functions", "Blank (_)", "BlankSequence (__)". –  Alexey Popkov Oct 11 '11 at 13:45
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Perhaps simpler

check[a : {__Rule}, b : {__Rule}] :=  SameQ @@ Transpose[a /. b /. a /. Rule -> List]

EDIT

Here is an even more esoteric version, which has the advantage of being completely high-level, in the sense that we don't need to know anything about the internal structure of the rules, only how they act:

checkAlt[a : {__Rule}, b : {__Rule}] := # === (# /. #) &[a /. b /. a]

EDIT 2

Well, let me throw in another one, just for fun:

check1[{a__Rule}, {b__Rule}] := SameQ @@ ({a, b} /. {{a, b}, {b, a}})
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@Nakilon The idea is that we act with rules from b on l.h.s of a. This assumes that no vars are on the r.h.s of a. E.g., if a is {c->1,d->2,e->3}, and b is {c->1,d->3,f->4}, you get for a/.b this: {1->1,2->3,e->4}. We act now with a, so that those vars not in b l.h.s. will be replaced as well. You get then {1->1,2->3,4->4}. For rule sets to be the same, the l.h.s. and r.h.s of rules must be the same. This is checked by the rest of the code, where rules are converted to sub-lists first. –  Leonid Shifrin Oct 11 '11 at 14:38
1  
@Alexey Indeed, my version is not very general. I was using the OP's spec: rules are restricted to be of the form var->int, but it will work also in all cases when there are no variables on the r.h.s. –  Leonid Shifrin Oct 11 '11 at 14:57
1  
@Alexey If we get a list of idle rules like {1->1,2->2}, then it is unchanged when we act on it with itself. If we have a list where some rules are not idle, like say {1->1,2->3,3->3}, then the list will necessarily change when we act on it with itself (#/.#), which also seems rather easy to see, because those same l.h.sides which are different will be replaced with their r.h. sides, giving a different list of rules. –  Leonid Shifrin Oct 11 '11 at 16:47
1  
@Leonid Oops! This behavior is documented in the "More information" field. Sorry for confusion. –  Alexey Popkov Oct 11 '11 at 20:18
1  
@Alexey Oh, but it is, although in a tutorial rather than a function page: reference.wolfram.com/mathematica/tutorial/… –  Leonid Shifrin Oct 11 '11 at 22:32
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Here's a slightly generalized approach:

In[24]:= check[lists__] := 
 And @@ (SameQ @@@ GatherBy[Join[lists], First])

In[25]:= {
  {a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}~check~{a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}, 
  {a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}~check~{a -> 3, b -> 2, c -> 4}, 
  {a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}~check~{a -> 1, b -> 3, c -> 4}, 
  {a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}~check~{c -> 4, d -> 8, e -> 9}, 
  {a -> 3, b -> 1, c -> 4}~check~{d -> 8, e -> 9, f -> 7}
  }

Out[25]= {True, False, False, True, True}

This one doesn't require the elements to be rules, they could be lists, or pretty much any other head. It should also work on any number of inputs.

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+1 - A nice generalization. –  Leonid Shifrin Oct 12 '11 at 20:09
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