Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Im wondering whether im handling exceptions correctly in my code so was hoping someone would give me some thoughts on my code below

 public IEnumerable<Job> GetAll() {
        try {
            return this._context.Jobs;
        } catch (SqlException ex) {
            //error so dispose of context
            this.Dispose();
            //wrap and rethrow back to caller
            throw new CentralRepositoryException("Error getting all jobs", ex);
        }

    }

this method is part of my business logic and calls the method above

    public IEnumerable<Job> GetAllJobs() {
        try {
            return this._jobsRepository.GetAll();
        } catch (CentralRepositoryException ex) {
            //logging code to go here
            //throw back to caller
            throw;
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            this._jobsRepository.Dispose();
            //logging code to go here
            //throw simple exception to caller
            throw new CentralRepositoryException("A general exception has occurred");
        }
    }

my custom exception

public class CentralRepositoryException : System.Exception {
    public CentralRepositoryException(string message, Exception innerException)
        : base(message, innerException) {
    }

    public CentralRepositoryException(string message){
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
This looks like a code review question! – AksharRoop Oct 11 '11 at 13:58

There are a few problems with this approach:

  • Returning IEnumerable<T> will cause delayed execution of the code. Even if you return IEnumerable<T>, in the code use this._jobsRepository.GetAll().ToList();
  • Delayed execution causes the error handler not to be called at all since the code will be running delayed and in the client context (i.e. wherever you are using it)
  • Wrap all your IDisposable objects in a using block

So an alternative would be:

public IEnumerable<Job> GetAllJobs() {
    try {
        using(var jobsRepository = new JobsRepository()) // !!! Use Dependency Injection, etc
        {
              return jobsRepository .GetAll().ToList(); // !! NOTE: ToList() avoids delayed execution

        }
    } catch (CentralRepositoryException ex) {
        //logging code to go here
        //throw back to caller
        throw;
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        //logging code to go here
        //throw simple exception to caller
        throw new CentralRepositoryException("A general exception has occurred", ex); // !!!!!! INCLUDE THE ORIGINAL ERROR !!!!!!!
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
ahhh ok. Wrapping in the using block disposes of them automatically. i forgot about that – Richard Banks Oct 11 '11 at 12:51
    
actually thinking about it i dont want to dispose after every call as this destrys the context. Hence why i was doing it only if there is a exception – Richard Banks Oct 11 '11 at 12:59

You shouldn't simply re-throw an exception as you loose the stack trace. I can see you're using them to dispose of the objects, this should be in a finally block.

Unless you can truly handle an exception you shouldn't be using a catch, as you want it to bubble up the call stack so that it can be fixed - rather than hidden.

share|improve this answer
2  
He uses throw; which preserves the call stack. – PVitt Oct 11 '11 at 12:46
    
@m.edmondson the reason im disposing of the objects in the catch clause is so that if there isnt an exception objects im disposing are still available. Any ideas? – Richard Banks Oct 11 '11 at 12:47
    
@m.edmondson im catching both exception and centralrepositoryexception – Richard Banks Oct 11 '11 at 12:50
    
@PVitt - Only if you use the singular 'throw' but he's making a new object. – m.edmondson Oct 11 '11 at 12:53
    
which he is using at least in one catch block. – PVitt Oct 11 '11 at 13:04

That's not the correct use of Dispose(). If you notice you end up writing:

this.Dispose(); 
this._jobsRepository.Dispose(); 

Both of these are refering to the same object. To ensure that you only dispose once, it is the reposability of the class declaring the IDisposable to call dispose.

This means that if you create a local variable, you do so in a using statement:

using(SomethingDisposable foo = new SomethingDisposable())
{
    //...
}

or explictly dispose:

SomethingDisposable foo = new SomethingDisposable();
try
{
    //...
}
finally
{
    ((IDisposable)foo).Dispose();
}

If you create a field you make your class disposable too:

class MyDisposable : IDisposable
{
    private SomethingDisposable foo = new SomethingDisposable();

    void IDisposable.Dispose()
    {
        foo.Dispose();
    }
}

If you treat you IDisposables in this way then your exception handling won't get confussed with your disposing.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.