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Let's say I have the following class :

public class Person { 

    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string SurName { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public string Gender { get; set; }

}

Also, I have the following method and I am reaching out to person data via a repository.

public IEnumerable<Person> getPeople(string searchField, string searchTerm) { 

    //_repo.GetAll() returns IEnumerable<Person>
    var model = _repo.GetAll(); 

    //Need the logic here for filtering

    return model;
}

As you can see I am getting two parameter for the method : searchField and searchTerm.

searchField is for the field name whose value will be used for filtering. searchTerm is the value which will be used to compare with retrived value (sorry if I am not clear here but this is the most I can come up with)

What I would normally do is as follows :

public IEnumerable<Person> getPeople(string searchField, string searchTerm) { 

    //_repo.GetAll() returns IEnumerable<Person>
    var model = _repo.GetAll(); 

    switch(searchField) { 

        case "FirstName":
            model = model.Where(x => x.FirstName == searchTerm);
            break;

        case "SurName":
            model = model.Where(x => x.SurName == searchTerm);
            break;

        //Keeps going
    }

    return model;

}

Which will work just fine. But if I make a change on my class, this code will have a change to break or be in lack of some functions if I add new properties this class.

What I am looking for is something like below :

NOTE :

This below code completely belongs to my imagination and there is no such a thing exists.

model = model.Where(x => x.GetPropertyByName(searchField) == searchTerm);

Am I flying too high here if it is impossible or being complete idiot if there is already a built in way for this?

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7 Answers

I use this extension method to achieve what you want.

public static IQueryable<TEntity> Where<TEntity>(this IQueryable<TEntity> source, string propertyName, string value) 
{

    Expression<Func<TEntity, bool>> whereExpression = x => x.GetType().InvokeMember(propertyName, BindingFlags.GetProperty, null, x, null).ObjectToString().IndexOf(value, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) >= 0;

    return source.Where(whereExpression);       
}

Note: ObjectToString is just another extension method that returns string.Empty if the Object passed in is NULL

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This won't be translated to SQL and will be executed on objects loaded from DB, so potentially you will be bringing back the whole table. –  Jakub Konecki Oct 16 '11 at 8:05
    
@jakubkonecki good point but that doesn't make it not useful. I use this sort of thing to filter objects that I receive from web service calls. Some times these web methods don't offer filtering capabilities, or they simply take long to return. If you already have your objects from the db this is still useful. There are many valid scenarios where not going back to the DB to filter data makes more sense. Web servers and data bases are not always on the same box or even the same geographical location –  Icarus Oct 16 '11 at 12:35
    
I do agree that Linq2Objects can be useful, the question however, thanks to Repository pattern, seems to be related to querying DB. –  Jakub Konecki Oct 16 '11 at 21:00
    
@JakubKonecki 1. It has nothing to do with the repository pattern, the OP is already getting IEnumerable<Person> when he calls _repo.GetAll(); (see comment on his question) so he already has concrete objects. Linq2Objects fits perfectly well here. 2. I do not assume the use of repository pattern just because a variable has the name repository. 3. No risk on using my method and getting the whole table contents. It will throw a runtime exception right away precisely because it can't be translated to SQL. –  Icarus Oct 16 '11 at 21:30
    
AD 1. IQueryable : IEnumerable - so GetAll() may still return Linq query, not concrete objects. AD 2. But combined with the name of the method, parameters and the functionality it makes a compelling case AD 3. This is precisely why I've down-voted. –  Jakub Konecki Oct 16 '11 at 22:03
show 3 more comments

For linq2Object You can use reflection as bellow(it's not very fast):

model.Where(x => x.GetType().GetProperty(propName).GetValue(x, null) == propVal);

but for linq2Entity I think this doesn't work, it works for linq2objects.

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This should be type-safe:

public IEnumerable<T> Where<T,U>(Func<T,U> propertySelector, U value)
{
  return  model.Where(x => propertySelector(x) == value);
}

usage:

Where((MyClass x) => x.PropertyName, propertyValue);

Or:

public IEnumerable<T> Where<T>(Func<T,bool> entitySelector)
{
  return  model.Where(entitySelector);
}

usage:

Where<MyClass>(x => x.PropertyName == propertyValue && x.OtherProperty == otherValue);
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I think the following implementation looks an awful lot like what you originally intended, although changing this to a generic method likely makes more sense.

public IEnumerable<Person> getPeople(string searchField, string searchTerm) {
        PropertyInfo getter=typeof(Person).GetProperty(searchField);
        if(getter==null) {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("searchField");
        }
        return _repo.GetAll().Where(x => getter.GetValue(x, null).ToString()==searchTerm);
}
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Use Reflection

model = model.Where(x =>
((string)x.GetType().GetProperty("searchField").GetValue(0, null)) == searchTerm);
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Rather than messing with reflection, custom expression trees, etc., when using Entity Framework, consider using the Builder Method extensions to the standard LINQ operators which take strings rather than lambdas. These are much easier to build for dynamic query requirements:

 string filter = String.Format("it.{0} = @value", fieldName);
 var model = context.People.Where(filter, new ObjectParameter("value", searchValue));

Of course, this would mean that you yould need to modify your repository to return IObjectSet rather than IEnumerable. It would perform better as well. By returning IEnumerable, you are hydrating every row in your database to your repository and then filtering via LINQ to Objects rather than applying the filter back in your database.

For more information about the Builder Methods in EF, see the BuilderMethodSamples.cs in http://archive.msdn.microsoft.com/EFQuerySamples/Release/ProjectReleases.aspx?ReleaseId=4422.

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