Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
function foobar(){
    $.ajaxSetup ({cache: false});
    var response = $.get("http://mysite.com/return.php")
    document.write(response);
}

I'm trying to save the response from this as a variable. How can I do that?

share|improve this question
3  
Welcome to the world of async! You can't do that. – SLaks Oct 11 '11 at 13:47
    
Sorry if it wasn't explained very well, but using the async: false, it works. – jdborg Oct 11 '11 at 14:58
    
Do not use async: false! It will freeze the browser. – SLaks Oct 11 '11 at 15:44
    
It doesn't. Tried it on all. – jdborg Oct 11 '11 at 15:49
up vote 3 down vote accepted

$.get is an asynchronous AJAX call - your document.write line is going to execute long before the server even sends you a response.

If you want to access the return value, you'll need to do it in a callback, like so:

$.get('/return.php', function(response) {
  document.write(response);
});
share|improve this answer
    
so everything must be in there? – jdborg Oct 11 '11 at 13:49
    
@jdborg Yes, that's how asynchronous programming works. The get function returns before the response comes back. – Skilldrick Oct 11 '11 at 13:50
    
I've run that and don't get anything, not even JS errors. – jdborg Oct 11 '11 at 13:51
3  
i'm giving you a -1 as a flag because you didn't notice that document.write is being called asynchronously, which will mean that the entire page will be overwritten. – zzzzBov Oct 11 '11 at 13:52
3  
Such a shame that many people seem to be using AJAX without the faintest clue about what it is. – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 11 '11 at 13:52

You wont be able to do that unless you use $.ajax with the async option set to false. Otherwise, the callback used for AJAX will execute after the document is closed for writing, and you'll overwrite your entire page.

Instead, use load to dump obligatory HTML into the page asynchronously.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to load a page using it, I want to use it to return a variable (mysql / glob that kind of thing). – jdborg Oct 11 '11 at 13:53
    
@jdborg, load isn't loading a page. It's adding HTML content to the page. document.write is adding HTML content to the page as well; if you're simply trying to get a variable from the server, you're doing it very wrong. – zzzzBov Oct 11 '11 at 13:54
    
then please explain a better way. – jdborg Oct 11 '11 at 13:57
    
@jdborg, return a JSON object from the server, and the first parameter of the success callback is the variable. If you need to store it globally, you could use function(data){window.globalpollution=data;} as a success callback. – zzzzBov Oct 11 '11 at 13:59
    
I'm trying to run a glob using php. So all the return.php does is give a list of file names. I can't see how I can do that using this. – jdborg Oct 11 '11 at 14:01

$.get provides a success() function for handling the response...

function foobar(){
    var response = null;
    $.ajaxSetup ({cache: false});
    $.get("http://mysite.com/return.php").success(function(respText) { 
            response = respText; 
            document.write(response);
    });
}
share|improve this answer

You can use the $.load() function for this as this is it's intended purpose

See http://api.jquery.com/load/

From the manual:

This method is the simplest way to fetch data from the server. It is roughly equivalent to $.get(url, data, success) except that it is a method rather than global function and it has an implicit callback function. When a successful response is detected (i.e. when textStatus is "success" or "notmodified"), .load() sets the HTML contents of the matched element to the returned data. This means that most uses of the method can be quite simple:

$('#result').load('ajax/test.html');
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to load a page using it, I want to use it to return a variable (mysql / glob that kind of thing). – jdborg Oct 11 '11 at 13:53
    
This will complete the equivalent of your original post including the document.write bit. However, it wont store it in a variable. If you're not intending to write the response to the page then load() is indeed unsuitable, but then equally your OP is misleading. – Ben Swinburne Oct 11 '11 at 13:56
    
No, I said I wanted to save it as a variable. – jdborg Oct 11 '11 at 13:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.