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I like to turn an array into a hash. However, the values are of unequal length for each key.

Lets say I have

my @array = qw( A 0 B 1 2 3 4 c 5 d 6 7);

Now I like to use the letters as keys and for each such letter/key the following number(s) as their values. So @array should be transformed into %hash as follows

my %hash = ( A => [0],
             B => [1, 2, 3, 4],
             c => [5],
             d => [6, 7]
    );

The difficulty for me is the unequal length of each keys' value.

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2  
It could be easier for you to keep the structure regular: include single-element values as an arrayref as well. my %hash = ( A => [0], B => [1..4], c => [5], d => [6,7] ) –  JB. Oct 11 '11 at 13:58
    
@JB Thats a nice hint for further processing. Thanks! –  mropa Oct 11 '11 at 14:01
    
JB. is correct. If you do not do this, later on you will need to do extra parsing to separate scalars from array refs. –  TLP Oct 11 '11 at 14:02
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is a way to do it:

#!/usr/local/bin/perl 
use Data::Dump qw(dump);
use strict;
use warnings;

my @array = qw( A 0 B 1 2 3 4 c 5 d 6 7);
my %hash;
my $key;
foreach (@array) {
    if (/^\D+$/) {
        $key = $_;
        $hash{$key} = [];
    } else {
        push @{$hash{$key}}, $_;
    }
}
dump %hash;

Output:

("A", [0], "c", [5], "d", [6, 7], "B", [1 .. 4])
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$hash{$key} = []; probably makes more sense. –  ikegami Oct 11 '11 at 19:51
    
@ikegami: Yes, you're right. Answer edited. –  M42 Oct 12 '11 at 7:46
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Firs the answer for this specific example then some comments

my $hash = {};
my @array = qw( A 0 B 1 2 3 4 c 5 d 6 7);
my $key;
foreach (@array) {
    if (/\D/) {
        $key = $_;
        next;
    } else {
        push @{$hash->{$key}}, $_;
    }
}

And if you want to play in the debugger:

$ perl -de 0

  DB<18>  @array = qw( A 0 B 1 2 3 4 c 5 d 6 7);
  DB<19> $hash={}
  DB<20> foreach(@array){if(/\D/){$key=$_;next}else{push @{$hash->{$key}},$_}}
  DB<21> x $hash
0  HASH(0x347e568)
  'A' => ARRAY(0x348fee8)
    0  0
  'B' => ARRAY(0x346f188)
    0  1
    1  2
    2  3
    3  4
  'c' => ARRAY(0x34cefb0)
    0  5
  'd' => ARRAY(0x346f1e8)
    0  6
    1  7

Comments: unless your keys are giving information about if the value is scalar or array ref, is better to have all the values of the same type (in this case arrayref)

You would like to check if the last key has a value and decide if you want to initialize to undef or not.

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this code is very difficult to read! split up the line. –  stevenl Oct 11 '11 at 14:13
    
@steven So edit it. –  TLP Oct 11 '11 at 14:14
1  
edited. the point is that code that is hard to read will not be understood, which defeats your purpose in trying to help. –  stevenl Oct 11 '11 at 14:22
    
This is the code that I writed directly in the debugger to test it. I started to edit it with the 'my' and the semicolons. but I left the loop line in one-liner just in case someone wants to use it in the debugger (perl -de 0). There was another answer identical to mine (but with nicer format) posted while I was reediting my post, so I left mine unchanged to preserve diversity ;-). –  Pablo Marin-Garcia Oct 11 '11 at 14:23
    
@stevenl, thanks fo the edit stevenl. That is OK, but leaving also the one-liner with a note at the botom of the answer after your edits would not be so bad so the comments make sense, and you would be able to use it in the debugger is you want to play with the key delimiters. –  Pablo Marin-Garcia Oct 11 '11 at 14:33
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Or using map:

my @a = qw{a 1 2 3 b 4 5 6 C 7 8 9};
my ($key, %h);
map {  /^[a-z]$/i  and  $key = $_  or  push(@{$h{$key}}, $_)  } @a;

Isn't Perl fun?

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Slightly simpler than previously provided solutions:

my @array = qw( A 0 B 1 2 3 4 c 5 d 6 7);
my %hash;
my $values;
for (@array) {
   if (/\D/) {
      $values = $hash{$_} = [];
   } else {
      push @$values, $_;
   }
}
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