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In this code example, the ExecutorService is used one and allowed to go out of scope.

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    ExecutorService executorService = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(3);
    executorService.submit(new Runnable()
    {
        public void run()
        {
            System.out.println("hello");
        }
    });
}

Once executorService is out of scope, it should get collected and finalized. The finalize() method in ThreadPoolExecutor calls shutdown().

/**
 * Invokes {@code shutdown} when this executor is no longer
 * referenced and it has no threads.
 */
protected void finalize() {
    shutdown();
}

Once shutdown() is called, the pool threads should terminate and the JVM should be allowed to exit. However the executorSerivce is never getting collected and thus the JVM stays alive. Even calls to System.gc() don't seem to work. Why isn't executorService getting collected even after main() terminates?

Note: I know I should call shutdown() myself and I always do outside of testing. I'm curious why finalization isn't working as a back-up here.

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3  
Because garbage collection is “non deterministic” ie you cannot predict when it will happen, you thus cannot predict exactly when the finalize method will run. You can only make Objects eligible for GC and suggest gc with System.gc() without any guarantee –  jpse Oct 11 '11 at 15:02
    
You should never rely on finalization in order to close or shut down something. As jpse already said, garbage collection is non-deterministic and finalization is not guaranteed to ever run. –  Thomas Oct 11 '11 at 15:04
1  
JVM does not exit because worker thread is blocked in workQueue.take(); –  Ovidiu Lupas Oct 13 '11 at 13:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 24 down vote accepted

This doesn't really have anything to do with GC being non-deterministic, although it doesn't help! (That is one cause in your example, but even if we 'fixed' it to eat up memory and force a collection, it still wouldn't finalize)

The Worker threads that the executor creates are inner classes that have a reference back to the executor itself. (They need it to be able to see the queue, runstate, etc!) Running threads are not garbage collected, so with each Thread in the pool having that reference, they will keep the executor alive until all threads are dead. If you don't manually do something to stop the threads, they will keep running forever and your JVM will never shut down.

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Where is the reference from the Thread in the pool to the pool? I thought that might be the case and looked everywhere and didn't find any reference. –  Craig P. Motlin Oct 11 '11 at 15:44
    
Worker is an inner class, the compiler adds it –  Affe Oct 11 '11 at 15:50
    
You should add the info about Worker to your main answer, I think it's the crucial detail we were all missing. –  Craig P. Motlin Oct 11 '11 at 16:28

Affe is correct; the thread pool's threads will keep it from being garbage collected. When you call Executors.newFixedThreadPool(3) you get a ThreadPoolExecutor constructed like so:

ThreadPoolExecutor(3, 3, 0L, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS, new LinkedBlockingQueue<Runnable>());

And if you read the JavaDoc for ThreadPoolExecutor it says:

A pool that is no longer referenced in a program AND has no remaining threads will be shutdown automatically. If you would like to ensure that unreferenced pools are reclaimed even if users forget to call shutdown(), then you must arrange that unused threads eventually die, by setting appropriate keep-alive times, using a lower bound of zero core threads and/or setting allowCoreThreadTimeOut(boolean).

If you want your thread pool to finalize like you're expecting, you should do one of those things.

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Because garbage collection is “non deterministic” ie you cannot predict when it will happen, you thus cannot predict exactly when the finalize method will run. You can only make Objects eligible for GC and suggest gc with System.gc() without any guarantee.

Even worse threads are OS specific handled by the JVM and are hardly predictable...

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As easy as that; this is the definition of GC :) –  KevinDTimm Oct 11 '11 at 16:15
1  
You can force GC to run by creating a bunch of garbage and it still doesn't get collected, so it looks like Affe's answer is the correct reason. –  Craig P. Motlin Oct 11 '11 at 17:35

Finalizers are too unpredictable. Depending on them is usually bad practice. You can read more about it in "Effective java" by Joshua Bloch (item 1.7)

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Once executorService is out of scope, it should get collected and finalized.

Not really - once it is out of scope, it could get collected and finalized. There are no guarantees made in the VM spec about when objects are finalized, or even if they are finalized:

The Java programming language does not specify how soon a finalizer will be invoked, except to say that it will happen before the storage for the object is reused.

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