Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I been learning basics of generics and it looks like it can really improve the performance of the application. But, I am not able to see the generic equivalent of Hashtable. Please share some sample C# code for creating generic hashtable classes. I need this for a demo.

edit:Thanks for the answers.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 61 down vote accepted

Dictionary<TKey, TValue>

Note that Dictionary is not a 100% drop in replacement for HashTable.

There is a slight difference in the way they handle NULLs. The dictionary will throw an exception if you try to reference a key that doesn't exist. The HashTable will just return null. The reason is that the value might be a value type, which cannot be null. In a Hashtable the value was always Object, so returning null was at least possible.

share|improve this answer
    
Another difference is that if items are never removed, a HashTable may safely be accessed by an arbitrary number of reader threads while it is being written (it is not thread-safe for multiple writers). By contrast, Dictionary<TKey,TValue> is not thread-safe for any scenario other than multiple readers, zero writers, even in an add-only scenario. –  supercat Jan 10 '14 at 0:56

The generic version of Hashtable class is System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary class.

Sample code:

Dictionary<int, string> numbers = new Dictionary<int, string>( );
   numbers.Add(1, "one");
   numbers.Add(2, "two");
   // Display all key/value pairs in the Dictionary.
   foreach (KeyValuePair<int, string> kvp in numbers)
   {
      Console.WriteLine("Key: " + kvp.Key + "\tValue: " + kvp.Value);
   }
share|improve this answer
1  
edited to link the MSDN loband version. –  Gulzar Nazim Apr 21 '09 at 14:28
1  
Curious. Why does Microsoft call it a dictionary and others a hashtable? Hashtable always seemed mysterious to me until I read about dictionaries in generics. –  johnny Apr 28 '09 at 16:55

The generic version of a Hashtable is the Dictionary<TKey,TValue> class (link). Here is some sample code translated from using a Hashtable into the most direct equivalent of Dictionary (argument checking removed for sake of brevity)

public HashTable Create(int[] keys, string[] values) { 
  HashTable table = new HashTable();
  for ( int i = 0; i < keys.Length; i++ ) {
    table[keys[i]] = values[i];
  }
  return table;
}

public Dictionary<object,object> Create(int[] keys, string[] values) {
  Dictionary<object,object> map = Dictionary<object,object>();
  for ( int i = 0; i < keys.Length; i++) {
    map[keys[i]] = values[i];
  }
  return map;
}

That's a fairly direct translation. But the problem is that this does not actually take advantage of the type safe features of generics. The second function could be written as follows and be much more type safe and inccur no boxing overhead

public Dictionary<int,string> Create(int[] keys, string[] values) {
  Dictionary<int,string> map = Dictionary<int,string>();
  for ( int i = 0; i < keys.Length; i++) {
    map[keys[i]] = values[i];
  }
  return map;
}

Even better. Here's a completely generic version

public Dictionary<TKey,TValue> Create<TKey,TValue>(TKey[] keys, TValue[] values) {
  Dictionary<TKey,TValue> map = Dictionary<TKey,TValue>();
  for ( int i = 0; i < keys.Length; i++) {
    map[keys[i]] = values[i];
  }
  return map;
}

And one that is even further flexible (thanks Joel for pointing out I missed this)

public Dictionary<TKey,TValue> Create<TKey,TValue>(
    IEnumerable<TKey> keys, 
    IEnumerable<TValue> values) {

  Dictionary<TKey,TValue> map = Dictionary<TKey,TValue>();
  using ( IEnumerater<TKey> keyEnum = keys.GetEnumerator() ) 
  using ( IEnumerator<TValue> valueEnum = values.GetEnumerator()) {
    while (keyEnum.MoveNext() && valueEnum.MoveNext() ) { 
      map[keyEnum.Current] = valueEnum.Current;
    }
  }
  return map;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The next step is to use IEnumerable<T> rather than T[] for the function parameters. –  Joel Coehoorn Apr 21 '09 at 15:03
    
Yep. Adding that in just a sec –  JaredPar Apr 21 '09 at 15:06
1  
One can stack "using()" statements without indentation and curly braces. Makes multiple using's more readable –  data Oct 14 '10 at 14:20

The generic version of System.Collection.Hashtable is System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary<TKey, TValue>.

share|improve this answer
    
when would I use one over the other? –  johnny Apr 28 '09 at 16:59
    
Unless you are trying to maintain interoperability with .NET 1.x, there is no benefit to using the non-generic collections over the generic collections. –  bdukes Apr 28 '09 at 17:14
    
See When to Use Generic Collections (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms172181.aspx) on MSDN for the full explanation –  bdukes Apr 28 '09 at 17:18
    
Dictionary<T,U> does not allow duplicates. Hashtable does. That is a significant difference. –  wayne.blackmon Jan 13 '12 at 19:35
    
@wayne.blackmon with both Hashtable and Dictionary<int, int> I get an ArgumentException trying to add the same key (or value) twice via Add (and no exception in either case via the indexer). How are you seeing duplicates being disallowed? –  bdukes Jan 13 '12 at 22:13

Dictionary.

share|improve this answer
2  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Nasreddine Aug 29 '12 at 15:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.