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I like to add an user authentification to my REST webservice (Guice + Jersey).

I first wanted to solve the authentification with the Google Guice method interceptions. For example:

@Path("user")
public class User {

  @OnlyAdmin
  @Post
  public void addUser(String apiKey) {
  }

} 

But unfortunately Guice only support AOP for classes with a no-argument constructors.

  1. Is it generally a good idea to use AOP for user authentification?
  2. Are there other frameworks to build an user authentification?

Edit: Framework is maybe the wrong term. I'm only looking for a way to inject some code in every annotated method and this code should check the parameters of the method

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Your example does have a no-argument default constructor. Also I don't see this requirement in the Guice docs. –  dlamblin Oct 11 '11 at 19:32
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1827131/… and/or related stackoverflow.com/questions/1805843/… –  beny23 Oct 11 '11 at 19:38
    
@dlamblin yes, but in the real class are only custructors with arguments. See section Limitation in code.google.com/p/google-guice/wiki/AOP for the requierement –  Max Schmidt Oct 11 '11 at 20:49
1  
The only important point for AOP to work in your case is that your classes get created by Guice. If you have constructors with arguments, ensure that they are injectable (directly or with assisted injection). –  jfpoilpret Oct 12 '11 at 6:38
    
@jfpoilpret hey thanks, you're right. could you post this as an answer that I can mark it as accepted answer? –  Max Schmidt Oct 12 '11 at 6:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only important point for AOP to work in your case is that your classes get created by Guice.

If you have constructors with arguments, ensure that they are injectable (directly or with assisted injection).

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It wouldn't be AOP but you could inject a current user role bound to the request scope wherever the user needed to be checked and use either method intercepts or explicit logic to check that the right user class is performing some action.

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