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I'd like to find out where a delegate specified exclusively as a property in a particular WWDC Live Demo Video is declared (Note: You'll need an Apple Developer login to access the video).

The relevant code is listed below, omitting an iOS 5 property qualifier for NDA reasons. I believe this qualifier has no relevance for my query.

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
@class NSManagedObject;
@protocol CoffeeViewControllerDelegate;

@interface CoffeeViewController : UITableViewController
@property (_____,nonatomic) id <CoffeeViewControllerDelegate> delegate;
@end

@protocol CoffeeViewControllerDelegate <NSObject>
 // ...
@end

My questions are:

  1. Where is the delegate declared as a class member?
  2. Does the inheritance of the NSObject protocol by the CoffeeViewControllerDelegate protocol mean that runtime checking that the delegate has all NSObject methods will occur?
  3. Why is it necessary to forward declare NSManagedObject? Is this a common requirement when utilizing Core Data?

Many thanks for your time.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. I think this is an LLVM (Apple's new GCC replacement Objective-C compiler) feature, that means that the variable is create when you @synthesize the property (I'm not 100% sure about this)
  2. No. It would be checked at compile time
  3. You could also #import <CoreData/CoreData.h> but your code will compile more quickly just doing the forward declaration. Basically, it doesn't need to know anything about the implementation other than the size of it (it's an object so it's a pointer)
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1  
Great clarification, thanks a lot Stephen :) I'm sure you know this, but for sake of others reading: LLVM is an open-source compiler originally developed at the University of Illinois, and Apple have decided to use it. They didn't develop it. –  KomodoDave Oct 11 '11 at 16:17
    
Also, make sure to upvote the accepted answer :) –  Bartosz Ciechanowski Oct 11 '11 at 16:20

1) When you specified a property without a class member, objective c automatically create a private member for you.

2) It just tell you that delegate respects this protocol. You have to do this check manually using [delegate conformsToProtocol: @protocol(CoffeeViewControllerDelegate)] before the assignation. Protocol checks are usually done by compiler at compile time

3) Because you can have a cyclic import problem. If you just need to use your entity as a type use a forward declaration, if you use some method of an instance of this class you have to use an import.

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Thanks Giuseppe –  KomodoDave Oct 11 '11 at 16:23

Where is the delegate declared as a class member?

It's right there:

@property (_____,nonatomic) id <CoffeeViewControllerDelegate> delegate;

The ivar used to implement the property is synthesized (not shown in the code you provided), but that's standard practice these days.

Does the inheritance of the NSObject protocol by the CoffeeViewControllerDelegate protocol mean that runtime checking that the delegate has all NSObject methods will occur?

No, I don't think that needs to happen at run time. The compiler can check that.

Why is it necessary to forward declare NSManagedObject? Is this a common requirement when utilizing Core Data?

It's common to use a forward declaration anytime you want to refer to a class but don't need to use its interface. The alternative is including the entire header file where it's defined, or the umbrella header for the whole framework. That'd just slow things down here -- all the compiler cares about at this point is that NSManagedObject refers to some class.

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Thanks for further clarification, Caleb. I never realized that @synthesize would auto-generate a private ivar, I thought it was exclusively for the setter/getter. Good to know! –  KomodoDave Oct 11 '11 at 16:20

You do not now need to explicitly declare a _delegate ivar; your implementation simply needs @synthesize delegate.

You should still check at runtime that the delegate conforms to the expected protocol.

Based on the code fragment provided, I don't see a need for a forward declaration of NSManagedObject.

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There should be no runtime checking needed for the delegate, Alan; that's the whole point of the protocol. Runtime checking would only be needed for @optional protocol methods. I was asking whether the inherited protocol is automatically tested for by the compiler or by the runtime environment. –  KomodoDave Oct 11 '11 at 16:19
    
unless an object of anonymous type id is assigned, right? in which case the compiler cannot ensure that the delegate conforms. –  NSBum Oct 11 '11 at 17:01

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