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EDIT: Simplified problem and clarified question.

I am trying to convert this Stored Procedure into a LINQ statement:

SELECT UserID, MAX(RowID) as RowID into #tempa
FROM Users
WHERE Approved = 1 
GROUP BY UserID

SELECT (bunch of columns)
FROM Users INNER JOIN #tempa
ON (Users.UserID = #tempa.UserID AND Users.RowID = #tempa.RowID)
DROP TABLE #tempa

When I run this SPROC I get 292 rows. When I try to convert it to LINQ I do the following:

IQueryable<User> userQuery = db.Users.Where(x => x.Approved == true);
        userQuery = userQuery.Where((x => x.RowID ==
                        db.Users.Where(u => u.UserID == x.UserID).Max(u => u.RowID)
           ));
         IList<User> users = userQuery.ToList();

Result is 293 rows...

Now I change the SPROC to (it's a bitmask where value 2 is active):

SELECT UserID, MAX(RowID) as RowID into #tempa
FROM Users
WHERE Approved = 1 AND (UserAttribtues & 2) = 2
GROUP BY UserID

SELECT (bunch of columns)
FROM Users INNER JOIN #tempa
ON (Users.UserID = #tempa.UserID AND Users.RowID = #tempa.RowID)
DROP TABLE #tempa

I get 289 rows with the sproc.

Try the following with LINQ:

 IQueryable<User> userQuery = db.Users.Where(x => (x.UserAttributes & Convert.ToInt32(UserAttributes.Active)) == Convert.ToInt32(UserAttributes.Active) && x.Approved == true);
        userQuery = userQuery.Where((x => x.RowID ==
                        db.Users.Where(u => u.UserID == x.UserID).Max(u => u.RowID)
           ));

Result is 127 rows....

At first I thought it was my use of .Max in the subquery, which AD.NET corrected me below, but the numbers are way off still, what am I missing here? I'm not understanding something...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this should work, you can refactor out some predicates from this too.

 predicate = predicate.And((x => x.RowId == 
                                        db.Users
                                             .Where(u=>u.UserId ==x.UserId)
                                             .Max(u=>u.RowId)
                           ));

You can try something like this:

var result = from u in db.Users
let max = db.Users.Where(au=>au.UserId == u.UserId).Max(au=>au.RowId)
let maxUId = db.Users.Where(au=>au.UserId == u.UserId && au.RowId == max).Select(au=>au.UserId).FirstOrDefault()
where u.RowId == max && u.UserId == maxUId
select u

Check that against the sql (strip out any other conditions please for debugging). I think I missed the userId part, you'll need to match the userId as well, otherwise it should not work properly. I am sure you can make the query a bit better, for example, use let to keep the whole user object which has the highest rowid and then you can use the object to match both rowid and userid.

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something is wrong here, but it might be on my end, the unfiltered results in my LINQ statement doesn't match the results the store procedure in SQL gives me (I am trying to move from sprocs to LINQ). My LINQ statement and sproc return different results, so I think I am doing something wrong. –  DOTang Oct 11 '11 at 18:47
    
Please check the updated query. –  AD.Net Oct 11 '11 at 19:23
// Filter the list
var q = from s in userQuery 
    group s by s.UserId into g
     select new {UserId = g.Key, MaxRowId = g.Group.Max(s => s.RowId) } 

// Apply the filter
userQuery = userQuery.Where(i => q.Where(k => k.UserId == i.UserId && k.MaxRowId == i.RowId).Count() > 0).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work, it says: System.Linq.IGrouping<System.Guid,RSSDB.User>' does not contain a definition for 'Group' and no extension method 'Group' accepting a first argument of type System.Linq.IGrouping<System.Guid,RSSDB.User> could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) And your second where statement produces the error: Delegate 'System.Func<AnonymousType#1,int,bool>' does not take '1' arguments. –  DOTang Oct 11 '11 at 19:11

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