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I have recently learned that if you have a reference to a class as a function parameter, it is better practice and more efficient to store certain needed pieces of information as local variables rather than accessing the classes members every time you need them in the function.

so...

void function(const Sphere& s)
{
    //lots of calls to s.centre and s.radius
}

or

void function(const Sphere& s)
{
    Vector3 centre = s.centre; float radius = s.radius;
    //an equal amount of calls to centre and radius
}

I am told the second is better, but why? And also, where is a good place to start researching this more fully? (for dummys please!)

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6  
Whoever told you that is actually wrong if you are using even the most naive optimizing compilers. –  tenfour Oct 11 '11 at 17:36
2  
Your example is not a "reference to a class as a function parameter". Not that it matters. –  spraff Oct 11 '11 at 17:41
1  
@spraff It matters a bit, as now the members of s are on the stack as any other local variable, too, so the answer to his question is definitely "doesn't matter". But as the answers have said, it also doesn't really matter in the case of a reference. –  Christian Rau Oct 11 '11 at 17:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Whoever told you this probably thought that the second version was likely to be faster.

I think this is bad advice, for two reasons:

  1. It may or may not actually be faster. This depends on the compiler, on what exactly the code is doing etc.
  2. Even if it is faster, this screams premature optimization. One should micro-optimize only after profiling the code and establishing which part of the code is the overall bottleneck.
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The concept is intuitive, but wrong. The concept is that accessing members takes more calculations than local variables, so by converting members to variables, you save performance.

But this is wrong. Your compiler will optimize this in ways you could never imagine. Don't attempt to be smarter than the compiler.

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This could actively be dangerous. If s.centre or s.radius change during the execution of this function (say due to a function you call or another thread), you will end up with two inconsistent, old values in your local variables -- causing bugs. Even if you're doing this safely, why take the chances of introducing bugs when you can just refer back to the canonical variables themselves?

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You were lied to. Moreover, you should not be worrying about such minutiae unless you have profiled your code and found this to be a main source of inefficiency in your code. Don't try to outsmart your compiler's optimizer. It is better at optimizing your code than you are.

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Here is a general outlook of your code:

void function(Sphere s)
{
    Vector3 centre = s.centre; float radius = s.radius;
    //an equal amount of calls to centre and radius
}

First off, you'd gain much more efficiency by passing Sphere as a const reference. This way, a new copy isn't created, which is probably more expensive than member access. So the way to go is:

void function(const Sphere& s)
{
    Vector3 centre = s.centre; float radius = s.radius;
    //an equal amount of calls to centre and radius
}

Secondly, you shouldn't access members of classes directly. It may be easy now, but in a large project it's really hard to debug. You should use inline getters and setters. That way, the generated code is the same, but you have a single entry point.

Thirdly, this version isn't thread safe. What if a different thread changes s? s.center and s.radius would change, but you'd still be operating on the old values.

Lastly, compilers do a better job at optimizing than you can, so it's better to leave this one up to the compiler.

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Whoever told you that is wrong. You can improve performance by using inline functions. Also in your example use

void function(Sphere &s) 

Saves using the copy constructor.

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3  
If you really want to improve his code, then use a const reference, to keep the semantics of his version. –  Christian Rau Oct 11 '11 at 17:46
    
@Christian Rau what is the difference between using a reference and a const reference? –  SirYakalot Oct 11 '11 at 21:26
1  
@SirYakalot The difference is that you cannot modify the object referred to by a const reference (or rather a reference to const: const Sphere &s). So the reference basically behaves like a by-value argument, but without the unneccessary (and maybe costly) copy. –  Christian Rau Oct 11 '11 at 22:02

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