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I have seen some Apple examples that do call [super viewDidUnload]; and some that don't. I read an article (a few months ago so I dont recall the url) that said calling [super viewDidUnload]; was unnecessary but it didn't explain beyond that.

Is there a definitive reason why or why not to tell super that the viewDidUnload?
And, (if it should be done) do I call super before setting all my properties to nil, after, or does it matter?

- (void)viewDidUnload {
    // Is this necessary?
    // [super viewDidUnload];

    self.tableDataSource = nil;
    self.titleLabel = nil;

    // Is it better to call super before or after nil'ing properties?
    // [super viewDidUnload];
}

Thanks!

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After answering, I realized that there at least a few possible duplicates: [super viewDidLoad] convention Do I always have to call [super viewDidLoad] [super viewDidUnload] calling order –  Josh Caswell Oct 11 '11 at 18:14
    
@JoshCaswell Good catch, I swear I did a few searches before asking, not sure how I missed all of those. –  chown Oct 11 '11 at 18:20
    
Not a big deal, to my mind -- the design-y/procedural questions usually garner interesting new tidbits when they are duplicated (as opposed to the "Why does my array not work?"). Of course, it is still nice to put all those tidbits in one place. Plus, your question is quite well-written. –  Josh Caswell Oct 11 '11 at 19:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

1- Is there a definitive reason why or why not to tell super that the viewDidUnload?

Honestly I don't know the consequences of not calling it. You can try to not call it and everything works smooth, but imagine that Apple adds some importante piece of code that will run when [super viewDidUnload] is called, what will happen now? Bad things will happen probably and you will spend precious time trying to solve your problem. My rule is: when overriding, call the super.

2 - Do I call super before setting all my properties to nil, after, or does it matter?

It does matter, I have watched bad things happen when I called [super dealloc] before releasing my objects. The same way I saw my UI being slow because I did my calculations before [super viewDidLoad]. It always depend of what you want to achieve.

Bottom line, what I do in my projects for viewDidUnload is:

//release my views

[super viewDidUnload];

As for iOS6:

The method has been deprecated.

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3  
"[What if] Apple adds some important piece of code that will run when [super viewDidUnload] is called, what will happen now?" - That is a very good point that didn't really cross my mind until now. –  chown Oct 11 '11 at 18:25
    
Glad I could help Chown. :) –  RuiAAPeres Oct 11 '11 at 18:27
    
That is a good thought, although Steven Fisher's point is probably accurate that Apple is unlikely to pull the rug out from under us in this way. @chown –  Josh Caswell Oct 11 '11 at 19:01
    
Josh, that I call speculation. He is probably right, but I wouldn't put my hand in the fire for that... –  RuiAAPeres Oct 11 '11 at 19:06
    
Nor would I; there's essentially no cost to including [super viewDidUnload] (and Paul Tomblin makes an even better point as to why you should -- in case you change the superclass for some reason), but I think it's good to be clear-headed. –  Josh Caswell Oct 11 '11 at 19:12

viewDidUnload is like dealloc in that you are "shutting down" your object -- you're freeing up memory and putting it into a (semi-)inactive state.

The recommended pattern in Cocoa is to do [super dealloc] at the end of your subclass's dealloc because you need to make sure that all the stuff you've added to the class can get released before your instance is invalidated by being freed itself. The same idea, although it is probably less of an issue, holds for viewDidUnload.

In general, when creating, let the superclass work first. When destroying, let it work last.

You don't need to send [super deconstructionMethod] iff the superclass's implementation does nothing. I think that is the case for viewDidUnload, but I'm not sure, and that's kind of indicative of the proper direction: the superclass is opaque to you, so unless it's documented that its implementation does nothing, you should always call up.

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This was super helpful Josh, thank you. Wish I could "accept" both answers. –  chown Oct 11 '11 at 18:29
    
Glad I could help! –  Josh Caswell Oct 11 '11 at 19:06

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