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I have 6 classes which all perform the same actions. I would like to move common behavior to a common [base] class.

There are actions to be performed on 6 separate objects. The six objects are located in derived classes. Intuitively, the private member objects would be accessed through the child (derived class) in the base class.

What is the C++ pattern I am looking for?

class Base
{
  // Common behavior, operate on m_object
  ...
  void Foo()
  {
    m_object.Bar();
  }
};

class Derived1 : public Base
{
  // No methods, use Base methods

  private:
  MyObject1 m_object;
}

class Derived2 : public Base
{
  // No methods, use Base methods

  private:
  MyObject2 m_object;
}

The thing that is boxing me into this situation is MyObject1, MyObject2, etc offer Bar(), but don't share a common base class. I really can't fix the derivation because the objects come from an external library.

share|improve this question
    
You can call up a C++ hierarchy in a child class with ParentClass::method(args), if that's what you're asking, but there might be simpler ways to do what you want, like, as Vlad says, templates. –  birryree Oct 11 '11 at 18:17
    
What exactly are you trying to achieve? Some code would help us help you. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 11 '11 at 18:19
1  
super in Java gets you to a parent class, not a derived one. super in the base class would get you nowhere. –  Mat Oct 11 '11 at 18:19
    
@Luchian Grigore: I expanded the problem statement, but I think its a lost cause. –  jww Oct 12 '11 at 5:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If they are introduced in the derived classes, then the base class cannot directly access them. How would the base class know that all derived classes have a specific member?

You could use virtual protected methods like so:

class my_base
{
protected:
    virtual int get_whatever();
    virtual double get_whatever2();
private:
    void process()
    {
       int y = get_whatever();
       double x = get_whatever2();
       //yay, profit?
    }
}

class my_derived_1 : my_base
{
protected:
    virtual int get_whatever()
    {
        return _my_integer;
    }

    virtual double get_whatever2()
    {
       return _my_double;
    }
}

Another possibility (if you want to call the base methods from the derived classes) is to simply supply the arguments to the base methods.

class my_base
{
protected:
    void handle_whatever(int & arg);
};

class my_derived : my_base
{
    void do()
    {
      my_base::handle_whatever(member);
    }

    int member;
};
share|improve this answer
    
"How would the base class know that all derived classes have a specific member" - that's what I am asking ;) –  jww Oct 11 '11 at 18:23
    
@noloader: And the answer is, "it can't." You'll need to use a virtual accessor method, as Max has shown you. –  Fred Larson Oct 11 '11 at 18:28
    
@noloader: what Max put is one (the easiest) way for a base class to use stuff from a derived class. The base class cannot see its childrens members, unless you play with templates, and that is way trickier than what Max has proposed. –  Mat Oct 11 '11 at 18:28
2  
@noloader: But any hypothetical "super" concept wouldn't answer that question, either -- that's the exact opposite! So what were you thinking? –  Kerrek SB Oct 11 '11 at 18:29
    
@Kerrek SB : my bad. I editied the question to note my crossed wires. –  jww Oct 11 '11 at 18:51

Maybe you just need a template instead of superclass and 6 derived classes?

It seems that you need to access not the parent's, but child's field. You should do it by introducing an abstract method:

class ParentClass
{
  public:
    void f();
  protected:
    virtual int getSomething() = 0;
};

ParentClass::f()
{
    cout << getSomething() << endl;
}

class DerivedClass : public ParentClass
{
  protected:
    virtual int getSomething();
}

DerivedClass::getSomething() { return 42; }

If you need to access parent's method, just use ParentClass::method(...):

class ParentClass
{
  public:
    virtual void f();
};

class DerivedClass : public ParentClass
{
  public:
    virtual void f();
};

void DerivedClass::f()
{
    ParentClass::f();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I want to use the object in the derived class from the base class. –  jww Oct 11 '11 at 18:21
    
@noloader: see the updateed answer –  Vlad Oct 11 '11 at 18:26

What about deriving your six separate objects from a common base class? Then you can declare virtual methods in that base class to create your interface, and then implement them in the derived object classes.

share|improve this answer
    
That's basically what I have now. Its a massive copy and paste effort. Everytime something is changed in a class, I have to propogate the changes to five other classes. –  jww Oct 11 '11 at 18:25
    
@noloader: if you have that, there is no reason to have to propagate anything to the derived classes. –  Mat Oct 11 '11 at 18:42

C++ does and doesn't. It has a very powerful multiple inheritance support, so there is no super keyword. Why? Imagine that your base class is, say, inherited by another two classes, or even is a part of virtual inheritance hierarchy. In that case you can't really tell what super is supposed to mean. On the other hand, there are virtual methods, you can always have them in base class and implement in derived classes (that's what languages like Java do, except that they they don't have multiple class inheritance support). If you don't want to go with polymorphism, you can use something like this:

#include <cstdio>

template <typename T>
struct Base
{
    void foo ()
    {
        std::printf ("Base::foo\n");
        static_cast<T *> (this)->bar ();
    }
};

struct Derived : Base<Derived>
{
    void bar ()
    {
        std::printf ("Derived::bar\n");
    }
};

int
main ()
{
    Derived d;
    d.foo ();
}

This is an extremely simple example - you can extend the above example with access control, friends, compile-time assertions etcetera, but you get the idea.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this is that now the derived classes are not inherited from the same base. However, it looks like it ain't important for OP anyway. –  UncleBens Oct 11 '11 at 18:34

Have you considered not using inheritance?

class FooBar
{
   MyObject m_object;
public:
   FooBar(MyObject m): m_object(m) {}
   //operate on different m_objects all you want
};
share|improve this answer
    
this probably complicates things immensely, but MyObject is from another library, and its not copyable. To further complicate things, its got to live through a init/update/final life cycle (its a crypto cipher). The common behavior is the init/update/final. –  jww Oct 11 '11 at 18:46
    
"Have you considered not using inheritance" - yes, but I don't want to [re]implement everything in each derived class. That the external library objects do not share a common base class is killing me (but they do offer the same methods I am using). I think I'm going to have to suck it up. –  jww Oct 12 '11 at 5:17
    
But then how about template <class LibraryObject> class FooBar { LibraryObject libo; ... }; (or even just a function template to call the life cycle functions)? –  UncleBens Oct 12 '11 at 7:05

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