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For example, I have a number between 1~100 and I need to scale it to be between 20~80.

Examples:

1 scales to 20
100 scales to 80
50 scales to 50
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This question should be asked at math.stackexchange.com This forum is specific to programming. –  Maz Oct 11 '11 at 19:17
    
Why does 50 scale to 40? If this is a linear transformation, the result should be around 50. –  NPE Oct 11 '11 at 19:18
    
Sorry my bad, fixed as such. –  Yongke Bill Yu Oct 11 '11 at 19:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're looking for a function f such that :

f(x) = ax +b

f(1)=20
f(100)=80

Then

a+b=20
100a+b=80

You get :

99a +20 = 80

then a =60/99=20/33
and b = 20 - 20/33 = 20*(32/33)

Have a look at this question for more information :

Invert and convert slider value

Note: if 50 scales to 40 your transformation is not linear. So you need to look for another type of function:

f(x) = ax**2 + b x + c

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sorry sorry, it's a mistake, 50 scale to 50! –  Yongke Bill Yu Oct 11 '11 at 19:47
    
I used your linear equation and it works well! Thanks for the help. –  Yongke Bill Yu Oct 11 '11 at 19:54
    
@user468384 you're welcome, you can have a look at the link I posted for a more general formula. Note that 50 doesn't exactly scale to 50 because you're not scaling (0,100) to (20,80) but (1,100) to (20,80) –  Ricky Bobby Oct 11 '11 at 20:09

You need to be more specific about what you're looking for. The rules you given do not produce a consistent LINEAR scaling.

For, if it were linear:

(1, 20) is on the line
(100, 80) is one the line

Slope is:

(80 - 20) / (100 - 1) = 60 / 99

Line is

y - 20 = (60 / 99) * (x - 1)

Then:

y = (60 / 99) * (x - 1) + 20

Then, testing x = 50:

y = (60 / 99) * (50 - 1) + 20 = 2940 / 99 + 20 != 40

Thus, there is no such LINEAR scaling.

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Sorry, the 50 scaling is a mistake, it scale to 50! –  Yongke Bill Yu Oct 11 '11 at 19:48
    
Okay, well it's still not linear (but it's close (linear would be to scale it to 49.6969...)). If you tell me you scale to the nearest integer, then we are fine. Use exactly the method I just explained to discover the linear equation governing the scaling relationship. –  Jason Oct 11 '11 at 19:50

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