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I am thinking of using domain object as @RequestBody. My domain objects are immutable objects and so they do not have any setter methods. Its a application/json request and I am using Jackson message converter.

@RequestMapping(value="/user", method=RequestMethod.POST)
@ResponseStatus(HttpStatus.NO_CONTENT)
public @ResponseBody void createUser(@RequestBody User user) {
    .......... 
}

Since I do not have setter methods inside my user object, when I do a POST request to "/user", I get UnrecognizedPropertyException from MappingJacksonHttpMessageConverter. Is there a way in spring in which I would be able to assign data using a static factory method(or constructor) of user object instead of setters.

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2 Answers

I found the answer myself. Use @JsonCreator. Here is an example. You can use it on static factory methods as well.

@JsonCreator
public NonDefaultBean(@JsonProperty("name") String name, @JsonProperty("age") int age)
{
  this.name = name;
  this.age = age;
}
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Nice answer, exactly what I was looking for. –  Alessandro Santini Oct 26 '12 at 19:53
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I think this is up to your JSON parser. I know that GSON[1] works on fields (as opposed to getters/setters), so you may have better luck using that. You'll have to writer your own message converter, I believe.

[1] http://code.google.com/p/google-gson/

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Also: as of version 1.2, Jackson allows use of "Creator" methods (constructors and static factory methods), which means that it is possible to omit setter methods if data is to be passed via constructor(wiki.fasterxml.com/JacksonFAQ#Data_Binding.2C_general). I wonder how MappingJacksonHttpMessageConverter could make it happen. –  Chandra Oct 11 '11 at 22:10
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