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How do I know if a software is done writing a file if I am executing that software from java?For example, I am executing geniatagger.exe with an input file RawText that will produce an output file TAGGEDTEXT.txt. When geniatagger.exe is finished writing the TAGGEDTEXT.txt file, I can do some other staffs with this file. The problem is- how can I know that geniatagger is finished writing the text file?

try{
  Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
    Process p = rt.exec("geniatagger.exe -i "+ RawText+ " -o TAGGEDTEXT.txt");
  }
share|improve this question
    
Doesn't .exec() block until whatever you're execing complets and exits? –  Marc B Oct 11 '11 at 21:07
    
No mark, it invokes geniatagger.exe- that is alright, but the program control goes to the next block of code straight away (while geniatagger.exe is still writing the TAGGEDTEXT.txt) –  Rushdi Shams Oct 11 '11 at 21:09
    
Does the program exit after it finishes writing the file? Can you parse the file to determine when it is complete? How do you know when the program is done writing the file? –  maerics Oct 11 '11 at 21:09
    
Normally, when I am running geniatagger.exe outside from java then TAGGEDTEXT.txt is created first and then the parsed texts are inserted into it (the file size increases... increases... and stops) @maerics –  Rushdi Shams Oct 11 '11 at 21:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't, or at least not reliably.

In this particular case your best bet is to watch the Process complete.

You get the process' return code as a bonus, this could tell you if an error occurred.

If you are actually talking about this GENIA tagger, below is a practical example which demonstrates various topics (see explanation about numbered comments beneath the code). The code was tested with v1.0 for Linux and demonstrates how to safely run a process which expects both input and output stream piping to work correctly.

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.util.concurrent.Callable;

import org.apache.commons.io.IOUtils;

public class GeniaTagger {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        tagFile(new File("inputText.txt"), new File("outputText.txt"));
    }

    public static void tagFile(File input, File output) {
        FileInputStream ifs = null;
        FileOutputStream ofs = null;
        try {
            ifs = new FileInputStream(input);
            ofs = new FileOutputStream(output);
            final FileInputStream ifsRef = ifs;
            final FileOutputStream ofsRef = ofs;

            // {1}    
            ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder("geniatagger.exe");
            final Process pr = pb.start();

            // {2}
            runInThread(new Callable<Void>() {
                public Void call() throws Exception {
                    IOUtils.copy(ifsRef, pr.getOutputStream());
                    IOUtils.closeQuietly(pr.getOutputStream());   // {3}
                    return null;
                }
            });
            runInThread(new Callable<Void>() {
                public Void call() throws Exception {
                    IOUtils.copy(pr.getInputStream(), ofsRef);   // {4}
                    return null;
                }
            });
            runInThread(new Callable<Void>() {
                public Void call() throws Exception {
                    IOUtils.copy(pr.getErrorStream(), System.err);
                    return null;
                }
            });

            // {5}
            pr.waitFor();
            // output file is written at this point.
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            // {6}
            IOUtils.closeQuietly(ifs);
            IOUtils.closeQuietly(ofs);
        }
    }

    public static void runInThread(final Callable<?> c) {
        new Thread() {
            public void run() {
                try {
                    c.call();
                } catch (Exception e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                } finally {
                }
            }
        }.start();
    }
}
  1. Use a ProcessBuilder to start your process, it has a better interface than plain-old Runtime.getRuntime().exec(...).

  2. Set up stream piping in different threads, otherwhise the waitFor() call in ({5}) might never complete.

  3. Note that I piped a FileInputStream to the process. According to the afore-mentioned GENIA page, this command expects actual input instead of a -i parameter. The OutputStream which connects to the process must be closed, otherwhise the program will keep running!

  4. Copy the result of the process to a FileOutputStream, the result file your are waiting for.

  5. Let the main thread wait until the process completes.

  6. Clean up all streams.

share|improve this answer
    
Superb! I think the previous solution works for many other exe files... but this one is particularly for genia pos tagger. Learning a lot from you guys. Thanks. –  Rushdi Shams Oct 13 '11 at 1:02

If the program exits after generating the output file then you can call Process.waitFor() to let it run to completion then you can process the file. Note that you will likely have to drain both the standard output and error streams (at least on Windows) for the process to finish.

[Edit]

Here is an example, untested and likely fraught with problems:

  // ...
  Process p = rt.exec("geniatagger.exe -i "+ RawText+ " -o TAGGEDTEXT.txt");
  drain(p.getInputStream());
  drain(p.getErrorStream());
  int exitCode = p.waitFor();
  // Now you should be able to process the output file.
}

private static void drain(InputStream in) throws IOException {
  while (in.read() != -1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The program exits and I tried to use Process.waitFor(). But the system is halted and no output file is created and when I stop the java program, then geniatagger.exe creates the output file. –  Rushdi Shams Oct 11 '11 at 21:20
    
You need to drain stdout and stderr from the process. –  maerics Oct 11 '11 at 21:21
    
how is it done? @maerics –  Rushdi Shams Oct 11 '11 at 21:24
    
@maerics Actually, stream draining should happen in another thread. Your solution might work most of the time, but will block when the process decides to flood stderr and closes the stderr stream before stdout. Using some Apache Commons class likely avoids this issue. –  JBert Oct 11 '11 at 21:30
    
@JBert: yes, quite true, just wanted to illustrate the simplest thing that could possibly work. –  maerics Oct 11 '11 at 21:31

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