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I'm using Boost 1.45 ASIO to handle some socket connections in an application that runs on both Windows and Mac. On Windows, the following code does not cause any errors, and my sockets are closed cleanly. On Mac though, both the shutdown and (if I comment it out) the close functions give me "Bad file descriptor" errors. Up until I call this code, the sockets work fine. But as soon as I call shutdown or close, I get the error. Any ideas what could be going on?

if(socket.is_open())
{
    socket.shutdown(socket.both);
    socket.close();
}
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It would help if you could clarify the intent of this code snippet. Normally the ~socket() dtor closes the underlying native descriptor type. Is there a reason you are explicitly closing it? –  Sam Miller Oct 17 '11 at 21:23
    
I thought that you did need to close the sockets - this error certainly doesn't seem to be causing any issues (besides the error itself), so if I don't need to explicitly close the socket, then I'll happily take that out and move on with my life. So to clarify, should I not need to call shutdown or close? –  Matt McMinn Oct 18 '11 at 2:44
    
I've added an answer –  Sam Miller Oct 18 '11 at 14:14
1  
I would advise against ignoring this error. "Bad file descriptor" on close usually means the file descriptor has already been closed, which is a potentially serious bug because descriptors get re-used. For example, if your program erroneously closes (say) descriptor 5 twice, and you (or another thread!) happen to create a new descriptor in between, the new descriptor will also be 5 and the erroneous close will close it. So while I do not know the answer to your question, I strongly advise identifying the root cause, and not ignoring it or "sweeping it under the rug" via the destructor. –  Nemo Oct 18 '11 at 14:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
if(socket.is_open())
{
    socket.shutdown(socket.both);
    socket.close();
}

Unless you have a good reason for doing this, I suggest letting the socket::~socket() destructor close the underlying native file descriptor. If you are concerned about leaking descriptors, use a tool like valgrind to analyze your program.

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Isn't that just ignoring the error? –  Nemo Oct 18 '11 at 14:47
    
This isn't really ignoring the error. The asio library abstracts away the native underlying type of the descriptor and does not require explicitly closing to prevent a resource leak. If there's a bug in the program double-closing descriptors, it is likely elsewhere. –  Sam Miller Oct 18 '11 at 16:42
    
The bug may be elsewhere, but the error happens here... And I am quite certain the boost folks will not throw any exceptions from their destructors. So your proposal is ignoring the problem rather than fixing the problem. (Inability to detect errors on close() is why relying on the destructor is poor style in general, IMO. In this case, it is definitely ignoring a real problem, whatever that problem is.) –  Nemo Oct 18 '11 at 17:33
    
I'm accepting this answer a bit reluctantly - I agree with Nemo that there may be a bug somewhere else, but after going through my program in detail, I can't find it - this is the only close that I had in there, so if I take this one out and let the destructor handle it, I won't be doing any explicit closes. For my program, ignoring it is reasonable because at this point the program is shutting down anyway, but for posterity, before going this route check for extra closes as Nemo mentions. –  Matt McMinn Oct 24 '11 at 20:02

"Bad file descriptor" on close usually means the descriptor has already been closed. This is often because of a double-close bug in some completely unrelated section of the program.

Such a bug can be contagious. If your program closes the same descriptor twice, and it gets re-assigned in the interim, the second close will close some unrelated object's descriptor out from under them. And then when that object closes its descriptor, it can actually be closing yet another object's descriptor... And so on, until the last one in line gets a "bad file descriptor" error.

This is a side-effect of (a) descriptors being global state and (b) the Unix requirement that any call to open/socket/etc. assign the lowest-numbered unused descriptor.

The only way I know to debug this is to monitor the creation and destruction of all file descriptors using a tool like strace (on Linux) or dtrace (on Mac). (Well, maybe not the only way. I once wrote a convoluted LD_PRELOAD hack to intercept every call to open and close to figure out which thread was double-closing their descriptor, because the second close was nuking the descriptor being used by another thread...)

Good luck.

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I had the same issue: on windows everything was ok, and on linux, an exception got thrown depending on the socket state IIRC.

An alternative to Sam's answer is to use a dummy error_code to silently ignore the exception if it does occur. See the close and shutdown overloads in the asio documentation.

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