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This is all asp.net c#.

I have an enum

public enum ControlSelectionType 
{
    NotApplicable = 1,
    SingleSelectRadioButtons = 2,
    SingleSelectDropDownList = 3,
    MultiSelectCheckBox = 4,
    MultiSelectListBox = 5
}

The numerical value of this is stored in my database. I display this value in a datagrid.

<asp:boundcolumn datafield="ControlSelectionTypeId" headertext="Control Type"></asp:boundcolumn>

The ID means nothing to a user so I have changed the boundcolumn to a template column with the following.

<asp:TemplateColumn>
    <ItemTemplate>
        <%# Enum.Parse(typeof(ControlSelectionType), DataBinder.Eval(Container.DataItem, "ControlSelectionTypeId").ToString()).ToString()%>
    </ItemTemplate>
</asp:TemplateColumn>

This is a lot better... However, it would be great if there was a simple function I can put around the Enum to split it by Camel case so that the words wrap nicely in the datagrid.

Note: I am fully aware that there are better ways of doing all this. This screen is purely used internally and I just want a quick hack in place to display it a little better.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Indeed a regex/replace is the way to go as described in the other answer, however this might also be of use to you if you wanted to go a different direction

    using System.ComponentModel;
    using System.Reflection;

...

    public static string GetDescription(System.Enum value)
    {
        FieldInfo fi = value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString());
        DescriptionAttribute[] attributes = (DescriptionAttribute[])fi.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);
        if (attributes.Length > 0)
            return attributes[0].Description;
        else
            return value.ToString();
    }

this will allow you define your Enums as

public enum ControlSelectionType 
{
    [Description("Not Applicable")]
    NotApplicable = 1,
    [Description("Single Select Radio Buttons")]
    SingleSelectRadioButtons = 2,
    [Description("Completely Different Display Text")]
    SingleSelectDropDownList = 3,
}

Taken from

http://www.codeguru.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-412868.html

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Great answer, I will probably use the regular expression answer as it's quicker and easier, however, this is a far better solution and so gets the accepted. –  Robin Day Apr 21 '09 at 16:08
    
I have seen many answers on enum attributes, but this looks the cleanest! –  nawfal Jul 31 '12 at 5:21

I used:

    public static string SplitCamelCase(string input)
    {
        return System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Replace(input, "([A-Z])", " $1", System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions.Compiled).Trim();
    }

Taken from http://weblogs.asp.net/jgalloway/archive/2005/09/27/426087.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Simple way to accomplish the camel case part ... the other approach is better for more customization. Thanks @Tillito –  rolivares May 23 '13 at 5:30
21  
I tweaked the regular expression a little to "(?<=[a-z])([A-Z])". This results in ProductID being converted to Product ID instead of Product I D. It specifies that the upper case letter must be preceded by a lower case letter (note the lookbehind operator). It also eliminates the need for the trim. –  Ben Mills Jun 26 '13 at 18:11
2  
Hey Ben, why don't you put that as an answer. Having a different (and more sophisticated) regex constitutes a new answer mate! –  Nicholas Petersen Jul 4 '13 at 19:21

If C# 3.0 is an option you can use the following one-liner to do the job:


Regex.Matches(YOUR_ENUM_VALUE_NAME, "[A-Z][a-z]+").OfType<Match>().Select(match => match.Value).Aggregate((acc, b) => acc + " " + b).TrimStart(' ');
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't handle Acroynms in the text like AMACharter, returns 'Charter' not 'AMA Charter'. –  Adam Mills Nov 18 '10 at 11:43
    
Although modifications to handle such a case would be easy (think of prepending something like ([A-Z]*) and slightly modifying the code), from what I recall of Microsoft's coding guidelines the use of such all-caps acronyms is discouraged, and in all-caps acronyms general acronyms should be avoided if longer than 2 letters. –  emaster70 Nov 30 '10 at 23:31
1  
Doesn't work for me. "CamelCase" becomes "Camel" and not "Camel Case". –  Tillito May 26 '11 at 11:39
1  
One line code = geeky pide rather than readable, maintainable code... –  Simon Nov 12 '13 at 16:17

The easiest way in my opinion to do this would be to use a RegEx to split the string into parts. This article, shows you everything that is needed.

You can just make a quick function in your codebehind that does the parsing and you will be set!

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Here's an extension method that handles numbers and multiple uppercase characters sanely, and also allows for upper-casing specific acronyms in the final string:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
using System.Web.Configuration;

namespace System
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Extension methods for the string data type
    /// </summary>
    public static class ConventionBasedFormattingExtensions
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Turn CamelCaseText into Camel Case Text.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="input"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        /// <remarks>Use AppSettings["SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords"] to specify a comma-delimited list of words that should be ALL CAPS after split</remarks>
        /// <example>
        /// wordWordIDWord1WordWORDWord32Word2
        /// Word Word ID Word 1 Word WORD Word 32 Word 2
        /// 
        /// wordWordIDWord1WordWORDWord32WordID2ID
        /// Word Word ID Word 1 Word WORD Word 32 Word ID 2 ID
        /// 
        /// WordWordIDWord1WordWORDWord32Word2Aa
        /// Word Word ID Word 1 Word WORD Word 32 Word 2 Aa
        /// 
        /// wordWordIDWord1WordWORDWord32Word2A
        /// Word Word ID Word 1 Word WORD Word 32 Word 2 A
        /// </example>
        public static string SplitCamelCase(this string input)
        {
            if (input == null) return null;
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(input)) return "";

            var separated = input;

            separated = SplitCamelCaseRegex.Replace(separated, @" $1").Trim();

            //Set ALL CAPS words
            if (_SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords.Any())
                foreach (var word in _SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords)
                    separated = SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords_Regexes[word].Replace(separated, word.ToUpper());

            //Capitalize first letter
            var firstChar = separated.First(); //NullOrWhiteSpace handled earlier
            if (char.IsLower(firstChar))
                separated = char.ToUpper(firstChar) + separated.Substring(1);

            return separated;
        }

        private static readonly Regex SplitCamelCaseRegex = new Regex(@"
            (
                (?<=[a-z])[A-Z0-9] (?# lower-to-other boundaries )
                |
                (?<=[0-9])[a-zA-Z] (?# number-to-other boundaries )
                |
                (?<=[A-Z])[0-9] (?# cap-to-number boundaries; handles a specific issue with the next condition )
                |
                (?<=[A-Z])[A-Z](?=[a-z]) (?# handles longer strings of caps like ID or CMS by splitting off the last capital )
            )"
            , RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace
        );

        private static readonly string[] _SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords =
            (WebConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords"] ?? "")
                .Split(new[] { ',' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)
                .Select(a => a.ToLowerInvariant().Trim())
                .ToArray()
                ;

        private static Dictionary<string, Regex> _SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords_Regexes;
        private static Dictionary<string, Regex> SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords_Regexes
        {
            get
            {
                if (_SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords_Regexes == null)
                {
                    _SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords_Regexes = new Dictionary<string,Regex>();
                    foreach(var word in _SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords)
                        _SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords_Regexes.Add(word, new Regex(@"\b" + word + @"\b", RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.IgnoreCase));
                }

                return _SplitCamelCase_AllCapsWords_Regexes;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
public enum ControlSelectionType    
{   
    NotApplicable = 1,   
    SingleSelectRadioButtons = 2,   
    SingleSelectDropDownList = 3,   
    MultiSelectCheckBox = 4,   
    MultiSelectListBox = 5   
} 
public class NameValue
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public object Value { get; set; }
}    
public static List<NameValue> EnumToList<T>(bool camelcase)
        {
            var array = (T[])(Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)).Cast<T>()); 
            var array2 = Enum.GetNames(typeof(T)).ToArray<string>(); 
            List<NameValue> lst = null;
            for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
            {
                if (lst == null)
                    lst = new List<NameValue>();
                string name = "";
                if (camelcase)
                {
                    name = array2[i].CamelCaseFriendly();
                }
                else
                    name = array2[i];
                T value = array[i];
                lst.Add(new NameValue { Name = name, Value = value });
            }
            return lst;
        }
        public static string CamelCaseFriendly(this string pascalCaseString)
        {
            Regex r = new Regex("(?<=[a-z])(?<x>[A-Z])|(?<=.)(?<x>[A-Z])(?=[a-z])");
            return r.Replace(pascalCaseString, " ${x}");
        }

//In  your form 
protected void Button1_Click1(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            DropDownList1.DataSource = GeneralClass.EnumToList<ControlSelectionType  >(true); ;
            DropDownList1.DataTextField = "Name";
            DropDownList1.DataValueField = "Value";

            DropDownList1.DataBind();
        }
share|improve this answer

The solution from Eoin Campbell works good except if you have a Web Service.

You would need to do the Following as the Description Attribute is not serializable.

[DataContract]
public enum ControlSelectionType
{
    [EnumMember(Value = "Not Applicable")]
    NotApplicable = 1,
    [EnumMember(Value = "Single Select Radio Buttons")]
    SingleSelectRadioButtons = 2,
    [EnumMember(Value = "Completely Different Display Text")]
    SingleSelectDropDownList = 3,
}


public static string GetDescriptionFromEnumValue(Enum value)
{
    EnumMemberAttribute attribute = value.GetType()
        .GetField(value.ToString())
        .GetCustomAttributes(typeof(EnumMemberAttribute), false)
        .SingleOrDefault() as EnumMemberAttribute;
    return attribute == null ? value.ToString() : attribute.Value;
}
share|improve this answer

Using LINQ:

var chars = ControlSelectionType.NotApplicable.ToString().SelectMany((x, i) => i > 0 && char.IsUpper(x) ? new char[] { ' ', x } : new char[] { x });

Console.WriteLine(new string(chars.ToArray()));
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1  
You should move back to coding with C\C++ :D - way too dirty for C# –  data Aug 9 '10 at 14:25
    
Well I did state that it was a quick and dirty hack. Here's a cleaner LINQ version. –  Andy Rose Aug 10 '10 at 10:13
    
This doesn't handle Acroynms in the text like AMACharter, returns 'A M A Charter' not 'AMA Charter –  Adam Mills Nov 18 '10 at 11:55

Tillito's answer does not handle strings already containing spaces well, or Acronyms. This fixes it:

public static string SplitCamelCase(string input)
{
    return Regex.Replace(str, "(?<=[a-z])([A-Z])", " $1", RegexOptions.Compiled);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Disclaimer: credit goes to Tillito, provider of the original answer, and Ben Mills, who suggested the improvement in a comment. Since it's an improved answer and none of them posted or edited it, it deserves a separate answer. Would have saved me half an hour of debugging if it wasn't buried under comments to begin with. –  Petrucio Sep 16 at 18:50

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