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I'm trying to send a public key over a socket connection in Java. While I'm very conscious Java provides SSL functionality for this sort of activity, this is a uni assignment; I cannot use the Java implementation.

The server encodes its public key and transmits it to the client via socket connection. When the client receives the key and decodes it, it appears different. Not only this, the data received by the client appears different to that transmitted by the server. I believe this is giving me problems when I attempt to then encrypt a user name and password using this key.

The problem can be reproduced with the following code:

Client:

public class TestClient {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        final int sPort = 4321;

        Socket sock = null;
        Key serverPubKey = null;
        BufferedReader clientIn = null;

        // Initialise server connection
        try{
            sock = new Socket(InetAddress.getLocalHost(), sPort);
            clientIn = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(sock.getInputStream()));
        } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
            System.out.println("Unknown host.");
            System.exit(1);
        } catch  (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("No I/O");
            System.exit(1);
        }

        // Get server pub key
        try{
            int len = Integer.parseInt(clientIn.readLine());
            byte[] servPubKeyBytes = new byte[len];
            sock.getInputStream().read(servPubKeyBytes,0,len);
            System.out.println(servPubKeyBytes);
            X509EncodedKeySpec ks = new X509EncodedKeySpec(servPubKeyBytes);
            KeyFactory kf = KeyFactory.getInstance("RSA");
            serverPubKey = kf.generatePublic(ks);
            System.out.println(serverPubKey.getEncoded());
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("Error obtaining server public key 1.");
            System.exit(0);
        } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
            System.out.println("Error obtaining server public key 2.");
            System.exit(0);
        } catch (InvalidKeySpecException e) {
            System.out.println("Error obtaining server public key 3.");
            System.exit(0);
        }

    }

}

Server:

public class TestServer {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final int servPort = 4321;
        final int RSAKeySize = 1024;
        final String newline = "\n";

        Key pubKey = null;
        ServerSocket cServer = null;
        Socket cClient = null;
        PrintWriter cOut = null;

        // Initialise RSA
        try{
            KeyPairGenerator RSAKeyGen = KeyPairGenerator.getInstance("RSA");
            RSAKeyGen.initialize(RSAKeySize);
            KeyPair pair = RSAKeyGen.generateKeyPair();
            pubKey = pair.getPublic();
        } catch (GeneralSecurityException e) {
            System.out.println(e.getLocalizedMessage() + newline);
            System.out.println("Error initialising encryption. Exiting.\n");
            System.exit(0);
        }

        // Initialise socket connection
        try{
            cServer = new ServerSocket(servPort); 
            cClient = cServer.accept();
            cOut = new PrintWriter(cClient.getOutputStream(), true);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("Error initialising I/O.\n");
            System.exit(0);
        }

        // Send public key
        try {
            cOut.println(pubKey.getEncoded().length);
            System.out.println(pubKey.getEncoded());
            cClient.getOutputStream().write(pubKey.getEncoded());
            cClient.getOutputStream().flush();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("I/O Error");
            System.exit(0);
        }

    }

}

This may be as simple as informing me my key is not X509 encoded, however this appears to be the way a key is recovered from a file (also read as bytes) so I can't understand why it won't work?

Thanks very much in advance for any help/suggestions.

Edit: problem solved, see Jeffrey's response. Modified (working) code posted as response.

share|improve this question
1  
Why does your code have statements like "System.out.println(pubKey.getEncoded())"? PrintStream.println doesn't do anything special for byte[], so that will just print something like "[B@10b62c9" (meaning roughly "a byte[] at memory location 0x010B62C9"). I ask because you say that "the data received by the client appears different to that transmitted by the server", and I hope that the above statements aren't how you determined that. –  ruakh Oct 11 '11 at 22:50
    
@ruakh "and I hope that the above statements aren't how you determined that" unfortunately that's exactly what I was doing. I'm nearly a java virgin, actually, I had assumed it was doing some magical type casting into a char array or a string, would "new String(pubKey.getEncoded())" help me ascertain whether the sent/received data were the same? As far as I'm aware the byte array may not be able to be encoded correctly, but if they're equal I'll at least be able to roughly assume that's the case and try encrypting my user/pw again. –  mkingston Oct 11 '11 at 23:14
1  
I'd recommend "System.out.println(javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter.printHexBinary(pubKey.getEn‌​coded()))", which uses the JDK 1.6 DatatypeConverter class (hat-tip to Sii below) to convert each byte into two hexadecimal digits. Otherwise you'll be printing bytes to your console that aren't ASCII print characters -- hard to compare, and hard on your ears if the alert/bell/beep character is in there! –  ruakh Oct 11 '11 at 23:32
1  
I've solved the problem and they're equal, but will make the change and post my fix. Funny, just commented to someone else in the same room "I have no idea what that beeping noise is". Thanks for your help. –  mkingston Oct 11 '11 at 23:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In real-world code, I strongly advise against making direct use of the cryptography classes in this way. If at all possible, use the Java Secure Socket Extension.

That said, the bug I see is that you're mixing InputStreamReader access with a raw InputStream underneath. The InputStreamReader may read more bytes than you ask for in readLine — it's written to pretty much assume it owns the underlying InputStream and so can read ahead in buffered blocks.

To quote the javadoc:

Each invocation of one of an InputStreamReader's read() methods may cause one or more bytes to be read from the underlying byte-input stream. To enable the efficient conversion of bytes to characters, more bytes may be read ahead from the underlying stream than are necessary to satisfy the current read operation.

share|improve this answer
    
"I strongly advise against making direct use of the cryptography classes in this way" I understand this and wouldn't do so except that I think the purpose of my assignment is more to demonstrate understanding than to write a secure program. Thanks very much for your response, I'll have a play and let you know how I go. –  mkingston Oct 11 '11 at 22:36
    
For what it's worth, the same problem comes into play writing an HTTP processor (server or client). I've had to write a special unbuffered variant of InputStreamReader before to read headers without consuming any entity body bytes. –  Jeffrey Hantin Oct 11 '11 at 22:41
1  
If you can use other standard JDK classes, you could transmit the key as a single line of text. DatatypeConverter has utility functions to convert between byte arrays and strings in base64 or "hex binary" format. This should be easier to implement than a custom hybrid text/binary input stream. –  millimoose Oct 11 '11 at 22:57
    
I've sorted it, thanks @Sii, but I'll keep that in mind in future. And thanks again Jeffrey lesson learned re:buffered readers in general. Is it convention on here to post my fix? In a new comment? –  mkingston Oct 11 '11 at 23:27
1  
@user990403 Post as a new answer, please. You might even get some upvotes this way :-) –  Paŭlo Ebermann Oct 11 '11 at 23:33

It is possible to send the public key by object over socket for example we can write a class as Frame like below:

import java.io.Serializable;
public class Frame implements Serializable {
    byte[] data;

}

in client side just define the Frame and socket and just write into it:

Frame frame = new Frame();
frame.data = thePublicKey.getEncoded();
toServer.writeObject(frame);

in the server side decode the public key:

Frame frame = fromClient.readObject();
byte[] pubKey = frame.data;                 
X509EncodedKeySpec ks = new X509EncodedKeySpec(pubKey);
KeyFactory = KeyFactory.getInstance("RSA");
thepublicKey = kf.generatePublic(ks);
share|improve this answer

Firstly, thanks everyone for all your help, it's very much appreciated! 12 hours to go before this is due and I was starting to get worried, smooth sailing from here I think :).

Anyway, the revised code:

Server:

public class TestServer {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final int servPort = 4321;
        final int RSAKeySize = 1024;
        final String newline = "\n";

        Key pubKey = null;
        ServerSocket cServer = null;
        Socket cClient = null;

        // Initialise RSA
        try{
            KeyPairGenerator RSAKeyGen = KeyPairGenerator.getInstance("RSA");
            RSAKeyGen.initialize(RSAKeySize);
            KeyPair pair = RSAKeyGen.generateKeyPair();
            pubKey = pair.getPublic();
        } catch (GeneralSecurityException e) {
            System.out.println(e.getLocalizedMessage() + newline);
            System.out.println("Error initialising encryption. Exiting.\n");
            System.exit(0);
        }

        // Initialise socket connection
        try{
            cServer = new ServerSocket(servPort); 
            cClient = cServer.accept();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("Error initialising I/O.\n");
            System.exit(0);
        }

        // Send public key
        try {
        System.out.println(DatatypeConverter.printHexBinary(pubKey.getEncoded()));
            ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocate(4);
            bb.putInt(pubKey.getEncoded().length);
            cClient.getOutputStream().write(bb.array());
            cClient.getOutputStream().write(pubKey.getEncoded());
            cClient.getOutputStream().flush();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("I/O Error");
            System.exit(0);
        }

    }

}

Client:

public class TestClient {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        final int sPort = 4321;

        Socket sock = null;
        Key serverPubKey = null;

        // Initialise server connection
        try{
            sock = new Socket(InetAddress.getLocalHost(), sPort);
        } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
            System.out.println("Unknown host.");
            System.exit(1);
        } catch  (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("No I/O");
            System.exit(1);
        }

        // Get server pub key
        try{
            byte[] lenb = new byte[4];
            sock.getInputStream().read(lenb,0,4);
            ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.wrap(lenb);
            int len = bb.getInt();
            System.out.println(len);
            byte[] servPubKeyBytes = new byte[len];
            sock.getInputStream().read(servPubKeyBytes);
            System.out.println(DatatypeConverter.printHexBinary(servPubKeyBytes));
            X509EncodedKeySpec ks = new X509EncodedKeySpec(servPubKeyBytes);
            KeyFactory kf = KeyFactory.getInstance("RSA");
            serverPubKey = kf.generatePublic(ks);
            System.out.println(DatatypeConverter.printHexBinary(serverPubKey.getEncoded()));
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("Error obtaining server public key 1.");
            System.exit(0);
        } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
            System.out.println("Error obtaining server public key 2.");
            System.exit(0);
        } catch (InvalidKeySpecException e) {
            System.out.println("Error obtaining server public key 3.");
            System.exit(0);
        }   
    }   
}
share|improve this answer

Beside the mixing of Writers and OutputStreams that Jeffrey has explained, the following might also be problematic:

sock.getInputStream().read(servPubKeyBytes,0,len);

The JavaDoc for InputStream.read writes:

Reads some number of bytes from the input stream and stores them into the buffer array b. The number of bytes actually read is returned as an integer. This method blocks until input data is available, end of file is detected, or an exception is thrown. If the length of b is zero, then no bytes are read and 0 is returned; otherwise, there is an attempt to read at least one byte. If no byte is available because the stream is at the end of the file, the value -1 is returned; otherwise, at least one byte is read and stored into b.

The first byte read is stored into element b[0], the next one into b[1], and so on. The number of bytes read is, at most, equal to the length of b. Let k be the number of bytes actually read; these bytes will be stored in elements b[0] through b[k-1], leaving elements b[k] through b[b.length-1] unaffected.

That is, read() may read less bytes than requested. If you know there are more bytes, you should call read repeatedly until all data has been read, something like:

for (int p = 0; p < len; ) {
    int read = in.read(servPubKeyBytes, p, len - p);
    if (read == -1) {
        throw new RuntimeException("Premature end of stream");
    }
    p += read;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The byte array was written with an outputstream.write(byte[]) method, I'm not completely sure whether this is a writer? As Jeffrey pointed out above I read the array length with a buffered method which reads a few extra bytes in advance. I've replaced the writer for the length with an outputstream after converting the length to a byte array, and similarly the buffered reader for the length at the other end is now replaced with an inputstream.read(). Thanks for your response. –  mkingston Oct 11 '11 at 23:23
    
I missed that you were using both Writer and OutputStream in that method. I have edited my answer accordingly. –  meriton Oct 12 '11 at 17:00

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