Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the smallest clique number (that is maximum clique size) possible for a graph with n vertices and m edges? I was thinking of using Turan's theorem, but that just tells us an upper bound on the number of edges given the clique number. I've been stuck on this for days, and could use some help.

share|improve this question
1  
Is this homework? If so, please tag appropriately. –  PengOne Oct 11 '11 at 22:53
    
not homework, but rather an exercise on one of those programming challenge sites –  mambo Oct 11 '11 at 23:11
    
So you're passing the challenge on to SO? –  PengOne Oct 11 '11 at 23:13
    
only because i think its an interesting problem and i would like to finally know the answer –  mambo Oct 11 '11 at 23:31
    
fair enough. what's the site where this question was originally posed? –  PengOne Oct 11 '11 at 23:49

1 Answer 1

I don't believe this question has a simple answer (as is often the case with Ramsey-esque problems), but here is an approach to get you started (I'm assuming this is homework and so I won't try to work it all the way out).

Assume the graph is connected (without this assumption, the problem only gets harder). Let k be the smallest clique number possible. The extreme cases are:

  • If n = m-1 (equivalently, the graph is a tree), then k=2.

  • If m = (n choose 2) (equivalently, the graph is complete), then k=n.

From this one might reasonably infer that as m increases relative to n, k should also increase. Go with this idea and see where it takes you.


I worked out the numbers for small n,m and the results are not in OEIS, though possibly I made a computational error (please let me know if you find one). Here are the numbers:

n\m | 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
---------------------------
 1  | 1 - - - - - - - - - -
 2  | - 2 - - - - - - - - -
 3  | - - 2 3 - - - - - - -
 4  | - - - 2 2 3 4 - - - -
 5  | - - - - 2 2 2 3 3 4 5
 6  | - - - - - 2 2 2 2 2 3

Again, I'm assuming connected (at least n-1 edges) and no loops (at most (n choose 2) edges).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.